•  145
    The Divine Liturgy as Mystical Experience
    European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (2): 137--151. 2015.
    Most characterizations of mystical experience emphasize its private, esoteric, and non-sensory nature. Such an understanding is far removed from the original meaning of the term mystikos. For the ancient Greeks, the ”mystical’ was that which led participants into the awareness of a higher reality, as in the initiatory rites of the ancient mystery cults. This usage was taken over by the early Church, which similarly designated the Christian sacraments and their rites as ”mystical’ because they dr…Read more
  •  61
    The Mind and the Heart in the Christian East and West
    Faith and Philosophy 26 (5): 576-598. 2009.
    One of the most intriguing features of Eastern Orthodoxy is its understanding of the mind and the heart. Orthodox authors such as St. Gregory Palamas speak of “drawing the mind into the heart” through prayer. What does this mean, and what does it indicate about the eastern Christian understanding of the human person? This essay attempts to answer such questions through a comparative study of the eastern and western views of the mind and the heart, beginning with their common origin in the Bible …Read more
  •  60
    The concept of the divine energies
    Philosophy and Theology 18 (1): 93-120. 2006.
    The distinction between the divine essence and energies has long been recognized as a characteristic feature of Eastern Orthodox theology, one sharply at odds with traditional Western understandings of divine simplicity. Yet attempts by Orthodox theologians to explain the distinction have sometimes exaggerated its distinctively Orthodox character by a failure to attend to its historical sources. This paper argues that the distinction was a natural and reasonable consequence of the synthesis betw…Read more
  •  51
    This book traces the development of conceptions of God and the relationship between God's being and activity from Aristotle, through the pagan Neoplatonists, to thinkers such as Augustine, Boethius and Aquinas and Dionysius the Areopagite, Maximus the Confessor and Gregory Palamas. The result is a comparative history of philosophical thought in the two halves of Christendom, providing a philosophical backdrop to the schism between the Eastern and Western Churches.
  •  41
    Divine Simplicity and Divine Freedom in Maimonides and Gersonides
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 86 75-87. 2012.
    From the standpoint of belief in divine freedom , the medieval Aristotelian understanding of divine simplicity is deeply problematic. This is for two reasons. First, if the divine will and wisdom are identical, it would seem that God’s action must be wholly determined by His rational apprehension of the good. Second, if the divine will is identical with the divine essence, it would seem that for God to be able to do other than He does would mean that the divine essence could be different. This p…Read more
  •  31
  •  26
    Faith, reason and the existence of God
    Faith and Philosophy 25 (1): 106-109. 2008.
  •  21
    The Vision of God in Philo of Alexandria
    American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 72 (4): 483-500. 1998.
  •  16
    Introduction
    Faith and Philosophy 26 (5): 485-486. 2009.
  •  15
    Faith and Reason in St. Anselm’s Monologion
    Philosophia Christi 4 (2): 509-518. 2002.
  •  10
    Divine Simplicity and Divine Freedom in Maimonides and Gersonides
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 86 75-87. 2012.
    From the standpoint of belief in divine freedom, the medieval Aristotelian understanding of divine simplicity is deeply problematic. This is for two reasons. First, if the divine will and wisdom are identical, it would seem that God’s action must be wholly determined by His rational apprehension of the good. Second, if the divine will is identical with the divine essence, it would seem that for God to be able to do other than He does would mean that the divine essence could be different. This pa…Read more
  •  8
    Divine Freedom in the Greek Patristic Tradition
    Quaestiones Disputatae 2 (1-2): 56-69. 2011.
  •  4
    Faith, Reason and the Existence of God (review)
    Faith and Philosophy 25 (1): 106-109. 2008.
  •  4
    Boethius and theology
    In John Marenbon (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Boethius, Cambridge University Press. pp. 105. 2009.
  •  2
    Maximus the confessor
    In Lloyd P. Gerson (ed.), The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity, Cambridge University Press. pp. 2--813. 2010.
  •  1
    Ethics and the Challenge of Secularism: Russian and Western Perspectives (edited book)
    Council for Research in Values and Philosophy. forthcoming.
  •  1
    The Opuscula Sacra: Boethius and theology
    In John Marenbon (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Boethius, Cambridge University Press. pp. 105--128. 2009.