• Review of Michel Foucault, by Barry Smart (review)
    Essays in Philosophy 5 (1): 205-208. 2004.
  • While positivism as a theory of rationality is considered---at least among professional philosophers---to be moribund, if not dead, no unified theory of reason has emerged in its place. Reactions to this lacuna have generated three distinct responses. First, there are those content with this state of affairs who argue both for the impossibility and the undesirability of a universal, ahistorical theory of reason. Reason cannot have, and does not need, theoretical, systematic underpinnings because…Read more
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    In this paper I pursue a possibility that some versions of arguments addressed against the libertarian notion of self-ownership have some definitive implications regarding the equalisandum debate carried out by egalitarians. I have in mind specifically the kind of approach that challenges self-ownership as a morally fundamental value through some inventive counterexamples. So, while I shall argue that the negative arguments against self-ownership are conclusive, my primary attempt is to demonstr…Read more
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    In this paper I pursue a possibility that some versions of arguments addressed against the libertarian notion of self-ownership have some definitive implications regarding the equalisandum debate carried out by egalitarians. I have in mind specifically the kind of approach that challenges self-ownership as a morally fundamental value through some inventive counterexamples. So, while I shall argue that the negative arguments against self-ownership are conclusive, my primary attempt is to demonstr…Read more
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    Habermas and validity claims
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (2). 2005.
    At the heart of Jürgen Habermas's explication of communicative rationality is the contention that all speech acts oriented to understanding raise three different kinds of validity claims simultaneously: claims to truth, truthfulness, and normative rightness. This paper argues that Habermas presents exactly three distinct, logically independent arguments for his simultaneity thesis: an argument from structure; an argument from criticizability/rejectability; and an argument from understanding/reac…Read more
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    Review of “Michel Foucault” (review)
    Essays in Philosophy 5 (1): 29. 2004.