•  7
    At the Edge of Everydayness
    Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 10 (1): 43-48. 2020.
  •  7
    When is somebody just some body? Ethics as first philosophy and the brain death debate
    Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (5): 419-436. 2019.
    I, along with others, have been critical of the social construction of brain death and the various social factors that led to redefining death from cardiopulmonary failure to irreversible loss of brain functioning, or brain death. Yet this does not mean that brain death is not the best threshold to permit organ harvesting—or, as people today prefer to call it, organ procurement. Here I defend whole-brain death as a morally legitimate line that, once crossed, is grounds for families to give permi…Read more
  •  195
    Bioethical Pluralism and Complementarity
    Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (3): 338-349. 2002.
    This essay presents complementarity as a novel feature of bioethical pluralism. First introduced by Neils Bohr in conjunction with quantum physics, complementarity in bioethics occurs when different perspectives account for equally important features of a situation but are mutually exclusive. Unlike conventional approaches to bioethical pluralism, which attempt in one fashion or another to isolate and choose between different perspectives, complementarity accepts all perspectives. As a result, c…Read more
  •  12
    Technology tends toward perpetual innovation. Technology, enabled by both political and economic structures, propels society forward in a kind of technological evolution. The moment a novel piece of technology is in place, immediately innovations are attempted in a process of unending betterment. Bernard Stiegler suggests that, contra Heidegger, it is not being-toward-death that shapes human perception of time, life, death, and meaning. Rather, it is technological innovation that shapes human pe…Read more
  •  11
    The Moral Imperative to Morally Enhance
    with Ysabel Johnston and Griffin Trotter
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (5): 485-489. 2018.
    What is morality? Is “morality” something that admits of technological enhancement? What could it possibly mean for a society to have a moral imperative to morally enhance? We are compelled to take up questions like these as we move into the future of moral bioenhancement. Each article in this issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy attempts to bring some clarity as to what is meant by morality, such that one could be morally obligated to morally enhance. These articles broaden the scope…Read more
  •  13
    Christian Morality in a Post-Christian Medical System
    Christian Bioethics 20 (3): 319-329. 2014.
  •  18
    Renewing Christian Bioethics
    Christian Bioethics 20 (2): 141-145. 2014.
  •  46
    Maturing the Minor, Marginalizing the Family: On the Social Construction of the Mature Minor
    with R. Barina
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (3): 300-314. 2013.
    The doctrine of the mature minor began as an emergency exception to the rule of parental consent. Over time, the doctrine crept into cases that were non-emergent. In this essay, we show how the doctrine also developed in the context of the latter part of the 20th century, at the same time that the sexual revolution, the pill, and sexual liberation came to be seen as important symbols of female liberation—liberation that required that female minors be granted the status of a mature minor. To do s…Read more
  •  59
    Reviving the Conversation Around CPR/DNR
    with Kyle Brothers, Joshua Perry, and Ayesha Ahmad
    American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1): 61-67. 2010.
    This paper examines the historical rise of both cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the do-not-resuscitate order and the wisdom of their continuing status in U.S. hospital practice and policy. The practice of universal presumed consent to CPR and the resulting DNR policy are the products of a particular time and were responses to particular problems. In order to keep the excesses of technology in check, the DNR policies emerged as a response to the in-hospital universal presumed consent to CPR. We…Read more
  •  43
    Finite Knowledge/Finite Power: “Death Panels” and the Limits of Medicine
    with Kyle Brothers, Joshua Perry, and Ayesha Ahmad
    American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1): 7-9. 2010.
    This paper examines the historical rise of both cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the do-not-resuscitate order and the wisdom of their continuing status in U.S. hospital practice and policy. The practice of universal presumed consent to CPR and the resulting DNR policy are the products of a particular time and were responses to particular problems. In order to keep the excesses of technology in check, the DNR policies emerged as a response to the in-hospital universal presumed consent to CPR. We…Read more
  •  10
    Families, Dependencies, and the Moral Ground of Health Savings Accounts
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (6): 513-525. 2012.
    Health Savings Accounts have been marginalized in the West. In Singapore, however, they are foundational to the financing of health care. In this brief essay, I shall begin to sketch a justification for Health Savings Accounts. The family has always been thought of as a mere prolegomena to the polis and to be primarily about securing the goods of material life: food, shelter, intimacy. I shall first explore the recent scientific literature on the communal nature of human thriving and follow it w…Read more
  •  31
    Subjective Experience and Medical Practice
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2): 91-95. 2012.
  •  75
    The Roman Catholic Church, Biopolitics, and the Vegetative State
    with D. R. Morrison
    Christian Bioethics 17 (2): 165-184. 2011.
    Compelled by recent public and politicized cases in which withdrawal of nutrition and hydration were at issue, this essay examines recent Church statements and argues that the distinction between private and public forms of human life is being lost. Effacing the distinction between the sphere of the home (oikos), where the maintenance of life (zoē) occurs, and the city (polis), where political and public life (bios) occurs, may have unforeseen and unwanted consequences. Through their well-intent…Read more
  •  26
    Waiting for St. Benedict among the Ruins: MacIntyre and Medical Practice
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (2): 107-113. 2011.
  •  27
    Framing euthanasia
    Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4): 225-228. 2006.
    Death cannot be mastered through a metaphysics of efficiency that interprets all actions in terms only of cause and effect, but it can be transcended if we leave the frame open to death’s ambiguityIn the second of this two part series, I describe how in shifting our frames from one of human purpose and meaning to one of efficiency, we shift the possible answers we get to our questions about voluntary active euthanasia and physician assisted suicide . Thus, by placing VAE/PAS within the frame of …Read more
  •  51
    Biopsychosociospiritual Medicine and Other Political Schemes
    Christian Bioethics 15 (3): 254-276. 2009.
    In the mid-1970s, the biomedical model of medicine gave way to the biopsychosocial model of medicine; it was billed as a more comprehensive and compassionate model of medicine. After more than a century of disentangling medicine from religion, the medicine and spirituality movement is attempting to bring religion and spirituality back into medicine. It is doing so under a biopsychosociospiritual model. I unpack one model for allowing religion back into medicine called the RCOPE. RCOPE is an inst…Read more
  •  85
    Bioethics as biopolitics
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (3). 2006.
    This Article does not have an abstract
  •  23
    Revisiting Foucault
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (4): 323-327. 2009.
  •  129
    Echo calling narcissus: What exceeds the gaze of clinical ethics consultation? (review)
    with Joseph B. Fanning and Mark J. Bliton
    HEC Forum 22 (1): 171-171. 2010.
    Erratum to: Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? Content Type Journal Article Pages 171-171 DOI 10.1007/s10730-010-9132-7 Authors Jeffrey P. Bishop, Saint Louis University Tenet Chair of Health Care Ethics, Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics Salus Center, Room 527, 3545 Lafayette Ave St. Louis MO 63104-1314 USA Joseph B. Fanning, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Ave., 4th Floor, Suite 400 Nashville TN …Read more
  •  27
    Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation?
    with Joseph B. Fanning and Mark J. Bliton
    HEC Forum 22 (1): 73-84. 2010.
    Guiding our response in this essay is our view that current efforts to demarcate the role of the clinical ethicist risk reducing its complex network of authorizations to sites of power and payment. In turn, the role becomes susceptible to various ideologies—individualisms, proceduralisms, secularisms—that further divide the body from the web of significances that matter to that body, where only she, the patient, is located. The security of policy, standards, and employment will pull against and …Read more
  •  8
    Ethics, justification and the prevention of spina bifida
    with W. J. Gagen
    Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9): 501-507. 2007.
    During the 1970s, prenatal screening technologies were in their infancy, but were being swiftly harnessed to uncover and prevent spina bifida. The historical rise of this screening process and prevention programme is analysed in this paper, and the role of ethical debates in key studies, editorials and letters reported in the Lancet, and other related texts and governmental documents between 1972 and 1983, is considered. The silence that surrounded rigorous ethical debate served to highlight whe…Read more
  •  40
    Biopolitics, Terri Schiavo, and the Sovereign Subject of Death
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6): 538-557. 2008.
    Humanity does not gradually progress from combat to combat until it arrives at universal reciprocity, where the rule of law finally replaces warfare; humanity installs each of its violences in a system of rules and thus proceeds from domination to domination. (Foucault, 1984, 85)In this essay, I take a note from Michel Foucault regarding the notion of biopolitics. For Foucault, biopolitics has both repressive and constitutive properties. Foucault's claim is that with the rise of modern governmen…Read more
  •  61
    Modern liberalism, female circumcision, and the rationality of traditions
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (4). 2004.
    Tolerance is at the heart of Western liberalism, permitting mutually exclusive ideas and practices to coexist peacefully with one another, without the proponents of the differing ideas and practices killing one another. Yet, nothing challenges tolerance like the practice of sunna, female circumcision, clitorectomy, or genital mutilation. In this essay, I critique the Western critics of the practices, not in order to defend these practices, but rather to show that Western liberalism itself does n…Read more
  •  17
    Beginning at the End: Liturgy and the Care of the Dying
    Christian Bioethics 23 (1): 77-83. 2017.
  •  98
    Transhumanism, Metaphysics, and the Posthuman God
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (6): 700-720. 2010.
    After describing Heidegger's critique of metaphysics as ontotheology, I unpack the metaphysical assumptions of several transhumanist philosophers. I claim that they deploy an ontology of power and that they also deploy a kind of theology, as Heidegger meant it. I also describe the way in which this metaphysics begets its own politics and ethics. In order to transcend the human condition, they must transgress the human
  •  51
    Of goals and goods and floundering about: A dissensus report on clinical ethics consultation (review)
    with Joseph B. Fanning and Mark J. Bliton
    HEC Forum 21 (3): 275-291. 2009.
    Of Goals and Goods and Floundering About: A Dissensus Report on Clinical Ethics Consultation Content Type Journal Article Pages 275-291 DOI 10.1007/s10730-009-9101-1 Authors Jeffrey P. Bishop, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Avenue, Suite 400 Nashville Tennessee 37203 USA Joseph B. Fanning, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Avenue, Suite 400 Nashville Tennessee 37203 USA Mark J. Bliton, Vanderbilt University …Read more