•  35
    Aquinas, Suarez, and Malebranche on Instrumental Causation and Premotion
    International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (3): 335-353. 2012.
    In the analysis of Aquinas, instrumental causation is central to his doctrine of providence, yet their connection is not widely understood. On the one hand, early modern thinkers like Nicolas Malebranche claim that any notion of instrumental causation is unintelligible as a mode of divine operation. Alternatively, certain Thomists commit Aquinas to the doctrine of premotion, which partially resolves the problem of instrumental causation, but only at the cost of eliminating the causal freedom of …Read more
  •  2
    Defending God’s Strong Conservation
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77 145-157. 2003.
    Defenders of the strong view of divine conservation hold that nothing that God creates is capable of sustaining its own existence from one moment to the next without His immediate and continual influence. Assuming a traditional view about efficient causality, I demonstrate that simply in virtue of being committedto creation ex nihilo, the theist is thereby committed to this strong view of conservation.
  •  30
    A Counterfactual Analysis in Defense of Aquinas's Inference of Omnipotence from Creation Ex Nihilo
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79 145-155. 2005.
    There is a traditional view, maintained by Aquinas and others, which holds that there is a mutual entailment between the power to Create Ex Nihilo and the property of omnipotence. In his Metaphysical Disputations, however, Suarez attacks the traditional view by pointing out a seriousflaw in Aquinas’s argument. Suarez claims that there is no reason in principle why God cannot miraculously bestow CEN-power to creatures––albeit in a limitedform––even on the assumption that God cannot make creatures…Read more
  •  18
    Concurrentism: A Philosophical Explanation
    Dissertation, Purdue University. 2003.
    The main focus of this dissertation is the late medieval doctrine of Concurrentism. Concurrentists hold that God is immediately, causally involved in every event in nature, and yet so are creatures: For any natural effect to obtain, both God and creature must make a genuine causal contribution to the effect. Yet the presence of God's immanent activity in nature is claimed to not overdetermine or render otiose the real and necessary causal input of creatures. I develop and defend this view as fol…Read more
  •  23
    Defending God’s Strong Conservation
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77 145-157. 2003.
    Defenders of the strong view of divine conservation hold that nothing that God creates is capable of sustaining its own existence from one moment to the next without His immediate and continual influence. Assuming a traditional view about efficient causality, I demonstrate that simply in virtue of being committedto creation ex nihilo, the theist is thereby committed to this strong view of conservation