•  155
    Levinas: thinking least about death—contra heidegger
    International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1-3): 21-39. 2007.
    Detailed exposition of the nine layers of signification of human mortality according to Emmanuel Levinas's phenomenological and ethical account of the meaning and role of death for the embodied human subject and its relations to other persons. Critical contrast to Martin Heidegger's alternative and hitherto more influential phenomenological-ontological conception, elaborated in "Being and Time", of mortality as Dasein's anxious and revelatory being-toward-death.
  •  72
    Ethics and cybernetics: Levinasian reflections (review)
    Ethics and Information Technology 2 (1): 27-35. 2000.
    Is cybernetics good, bad, or indifferent? SherryTurkle enlists deconstructive theory to celebrate thecomputer age as the embodiment of difference. Nolonger just a theory, one can now live a virtual life. Within a differential but ontologically detachedfield of signifiers, one can construct and reconstructegos and environments from the bottom up andendlessly. Lucas Introna, in contrast, enlists theethical philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas to condemn thesame computer age for increasing the distance b…Read more
  •  45
  •  44
    Alternative oppositions to “infinity” and “totality” are suggested, examined and shown to be inadequate by comparison to the sense of the opposition contained in title Totality and Infinity chosen by Levinas. Special attention is given to this opposition and the priority given to ethics in relation Kant’s distinction between understanding and reason and the priority given by Kant to ethics. The book’s title is further illuminated by means of its first sentence, and the first sentence is illumina…Read more
  •  40
    The reputation and influence of Emmanuel Levinas has grown powerfully. Well known in France in his lifetime, he has since his death become widely regarded as a major European moral philosopher profoundly shaped by his Jewish background. A pupil of Husserl and Heidegger, Levinas pioneered new forms of exegesis with his post-modern readings of the Talmud, and as an ethicist brought together religious and non-religious, Jewish and non-Jewish traditions of contemporary thought. Richard A. Cohen has …Read more
  •  36
    Justice and the State in the Thought of Levinas and Spinoza
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 4 (1): 55-70. 1996.
  •  33
    Emmanuel Levinas
    Philosophy Today 25 (3): 196-203. 1981.
  •  30
    Levinas: Just War or Just War: Preface to Totality and Infinity
    Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 10 (2): 152-170. 1998.
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  •  25
    Levinas, Plato and Ethical Exegesis
    Levinas Studies 1 37-50. 2005.
    Chapter 7 of my book, Ethics, Exegesis, and Philosophy: Interpretation after Levinas, entitled “Humanism and the Rights of Exegesis,” was devoted to elaboratingthe notion of “ethical exegesis.” The notion of ethical exegesis is not only inspired by Levinas’s thought, but expresses the essential character of it, its “method,” as it were, the “saying” of its “said.” Accordingly, here I will begin by reviewing some of what I have already said about ethical exegesis, and then I will develop this not…Read more
  •  24
    Franz Rosenzweig's star of redemption and Kant
    Philosophical Forum 41 (1-2): 73-98. 2010.
  •  21
  •  20
    Le meme et l'autreModern French Philosophy
    with Vincent Descombes, L. Scott-Fox, and J. M. Harding
    Substance 10 (3): 79. 1981.
  •  18
    Difficulty and Mortality: Two Notes on Reading Levinas
    Philosophy in the Contemporary World 7 (1): 59-66. 2000.
    I argue against the work of simplifying and applying Levinas’s thought. Simplifying Levinas misses the point of the greatness of his thought, which is addressed to the most sophisticated philosophical thinkers of his day, and calls upon them to re-ground philosophy in the ethical. Applying Levinas misses the point that Levinas’s conception of alterity is perfectly concrete, because it is linked to morality through the mortality of the other.
  •  18
  •  17
    Merleau-Ponty, the Flesh and Foucault
    Philosophy Today 28 (4): 329-338. 1984.
  •  16
    Tears
    International Studies in Philosophy 25 (1): 109-109. 1993.
  •  14
    Face to Face with Levinas (edited book)
    State University of New York Press. 1986.
    An introduction to the ethical and ontological import of Levinas' philosophy.
  •  14
    Otherwise than Being or Beyond Essence
    International Studies in Philosophy 19 (1): 90-91. 1987.
  •  13
    Ricoeur as Another: The Ethics of Subjectivity (edited book)
    with James L. Marsh
    State University of New York Press. 2002.
    Leading scholars address Paul Ricoeur's last major work, Oneself as Another
  •  13
    The privilege of reason and play. Derrida and Levinas
    Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 45 (2). 1983.
  •  11
    Poetique du possible: phenomenologie hermeneutique de la figuration
    Review of Metaphysics 40 (2): 382-384. 1986.
    In many ways the whole of contemporary thought reduces to the search for new middle terms, such as 'desire', 'will to power', 'language', and "difference', to mediate, displace, or evade the classical philosophical dualisms, such as being and nonbeing, ideality and reality, mind and matter, is and ought. These dualisms--set up by the ancients, pursued by the moderns, and bequeathed to us contemporaries by their failures--are Kearney's target. His aim is to overcome them through the notion of fig…Read more
  •  11
    Dasein's Responsibility for Being
    Philosophy Today 27 (4): 317-325. 1983.
  •  11
    Alternative oppositions to “infinity” and “totality” are suggested, examined and shown to be inadequate by comparison to the sense of the opposition contained in title Totality and Infinity chosen by Levinas. Special attention is given to this opposition and the priority given to ethics in relation Kant’s distinction between understanding and reason and the priority given by Kant to ethics. The book’s title is further illuminated by means of its first sentence, and the first sentence is illumina…Read more
  •  11
    God, Death, and Time
    International Studies in Philosophy 35 (2): 154-161. 2003.
  •  9
    Levinas, Plato and Ethical Exegesis
    Levinas Studies 1 37-50. 2005.
    Chapter 7 of my book, Ethics, Exegesis, and Philosophy: Interpretation after Levinas, entitled “Humanism and the Rights of Exegesis,” was devoted to elaboratingthe notion of “ethical exegesis.” The notion of ethical exegesis is not only inspired by Levinas’s thought, but expresses the essential character of it, its “method,” as it were, the “saying” of its “said.” Accordingly, here I will begin by reviewing some of what I have already said about ethical exegesis, and then I will develop this not…Read more
  •  9
    Non-in-difference in the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas and Franz Rosenzweig
    Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 13 (1): 141-153. 1988.