Loyola University, Chicago
Department of Philosophy
PhD, 1990
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America
Areas of Specialization
Continental Philosophy
  •  12
    The Sinnsfrage and the Seinsfrage
    Philosophy Today 34 (4): 321-333. 1990.
  •  99
    Francisco Varela’s work is a monumental achievement in 20th century biological and biophilosophical thought. After his early collaboration in neo-cybernetics with Humberto Maturana (“autopoiesis”), Varela made fundamental contributions to immunology (“network theory”), Artificial Life (“cellular automata”), cognitive science (“enaction”), philosophy of mind (“neurophenomenology”), brain studies (“the brainweb”), and East- West dialogue (the Mind and Life conferences). In the course of his career…Read more
  •  37
    Once one of the most important philosophical concepts (it is impossible to think of Plato without erôs, or Aristotle without philia, or Augustine without caritas and cupiditas), love doesn't get much philosophical notice nowadays, at least outside psychoanalytic circles. Or so it seems. But couldn't one just as well say that Derrida and Deleuze think about nothing but love? What have they written that isn't linked rather directly to desire, to alterity, to getting outside oneself, even if "love"…Read more
  •  37
    For the most part, this is a fairly literal translation, but I have opted for a few English idioms for the sake of readability. In that spirit, I have kept the original punctuation, which results in very long sentences, but I have inserted paragraph breaks for readability. I mark these inserted breaks with this sign [¶]; unmarked breaks are in the original. In addition to providing the French for difficult translations, I also interpolate a few English words for readability. Translator’s notes a…Read more
  •  6
  •  19
    Dans cette présentation je vais essayer de vous montrer comment les principes deleuzoguattariens de la géophilosophie peuvent être mis en contact avec ce que j’appelle la « physiologie politique ». Ces deux domaines de recherche sont les mieux pensés par rapport aux « sciences de complexité », c’est-à-dire, par rapport aux modelages accomplis par les techniques mathématiques dans le domaine de la dynamique non-linéaire.
  •  139
    Philosophies of Consciousness and the Body
    In John Mullarkey & Beth Lord (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Continental Philosophy, Continuum. pp. 69-92. 2009.
    DEFINING THE LIMITS OF THE FIELD. Because 'consciousness and the body' is central to so many philosophical endeavors, I cannot provide a comprehensive survey of recent work. So we must begin by limiting the scope of our inquiry. First, we will concentrate on work done in English or translated into English, simply to ensure ease of access to the texts under examination. Second, we will concentrate on work done in the last 15 years or so, since the early 1990s. Third, we will concentrate on those …Read more
  •  60
    In 2005 Mike Wheeler published a very nice book with MIT entitled Reconstructing the Cognitive World: The Next Step. Wheeler writes about – and is at the forefront of – a group of researchers calling attention to what we can call 4EA cognition: "embodied, embedded, enactive, extended, affective." The philosophical resource for Wheeler’s “next step” is Heidegger. I think it's time we use Deleuze to take another next step.1 I’m going to use Deleuze’s essay on Lucretius as a lead. There, Deleuze wr…Read more
  •  29
    Applied liminology
    Research in Phenomenology 22 (1): 207-210. 1992.
  •  46
    Katrina
    In Bernd Herzogenrath (ed.), Symposium, Palgrave-macmillan. pp. 363-381. 2009.
    Hurricane Katrina was an elemental and a social event. To understand it, you first have to understand the land, the air, the sun, the river and the sea; you have to understand earth, wind, fire and water; you have to understand geomorphology, meteorology, biology, economics, politics, history. You have to understand how they have come together to form, with the peoples of America, Europe and Africa, the historical patterns of life of Louisiana and New Orleans, the bodies politic of the region, b…Read more
  •  14
    Is the United States on the verge of becoming an empire? This much-discussed question is, like too many current public issues, a badly formed problem. Not because it is impossible to answer, but because it is far too easy to construct an answer to fit your purposes.
  •  24
    In this paper I investigate the mechanics of killing, brining together neuroscience, military history, and the work of the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari. Investigating the Columbine killers and the way they negotiate with the intensity of the act of killing allows me to construct a concept of “political physiology,” defined as “interlocking intensive processes that articulate the patterns, thresholds, and triggers of emergent bodies, forming assemblages linking the social a…Read more
  •  148
    What does Foucault think is new about neo-liberalism?
    Pli: Warwick Journal of Philosophy 21 1-25. 2009.
  •  41
    In this paper I try to bring together two contexts in which the term “gene” is used. Perhaps this is overly hasty. But I’m trying to bring a term from an evolutionary context (“unexpressed genetic variation”) together with one from a developmental context (“constructed functional gene”)
  •  26
    Let’s look at Wikipedia itself, which is misunderstood constantly as “self-organizing and selfcorrecting.” In fact there is a strict hierarchy of levels of editorship. Also, “high-quality articles tend to experience entropic degradation … as various Wiki-workers … tinker with them” (423). Most Wiki-work is Sisyphean fight against constant vandalism, and most articles never converge on any stable form.
  •  51
    The Terri Schiavo case, the latest high-profile “right-to-die” case in the United States, whose denouement saturated the US mediasphere at the end of March 2005, is a particularly complex problem in the Deleuzean sense. Its solution, which took more than 15 years, actualized lines from legal, medical, biological, political … multiplicities. The ellipses indicate the impossibility of completely delimiting the forces at work in any case (the virtual as endless differentiation) just as it indicates…Read more
  •  27
    But first, let me note that these two are terms derived more or less directly from the collaborative work of the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. Now I think it’s important that analytic and continental philosophers learn to talk to each other, and I’m convinced that Deleuze and Guattari’s work, when properly explained, provides a common ground for this discussion. That’s because they provide the ontology and epistemology for a world that is able to yield the results we fin…Read more
  •  33
    To be delivered at the 2nd "Deleuze Camp" in Cardiff, Wales, in August 2008. The intended audience is composed of students and scholars of Deleuze who are non-specialists in philosophy of biology. Thus these are introductory lectures with a good deal of simplification and exaggeration. I wish to thank Dominique Homberger, Vince LiCata, John Larkin, Chuck Dyke, and Alistair Welchman for critical and clarifying comments. They have helped immensely, and the remaining infelicities are solely my resp…Read more
  •  31
    For the most part, this is a fairly literal translation, but I have opted for a few English idioms for the sake of readability. In that spirit, I have kept the original punctuation, which results in very long sentences, but I have inserted paragraph breaks for readability. I mark these inserted breaks with this sign [¶]; unmarked breaks are in the original. In addition to providing the French for difficult translations, I also interpolate a few English words for readability. Simondon’s notes app…Read more
  •  65
    Affect, agency and responsibility: The act of killing in the age of cyborgs (review)
    with Roger Pippin
    Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3): 405-413. 2008.
    Draft 13 April 2007. Under review at Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences.
  •  35
    Given Time and the Gift of Life
    Man and World 30 (1): 65-82. 1997.
    Given Time and the Gift of Life explores the following nexus in Derrida's thought: the gift, the mother, and life. The first section examines life within the trajectory of the gift, the excess of gift over return in the gift of life, and the rewriting of Aristotelian generation in differantial species-being. The second section shows the quasi-transcendental nature of Derrida's thought. The conclusion sketches some of the political consequences of the gift of life thought as the quasi-transcenden…Read more