•  3
    The human right to subsistence
    Philosophy Compass. forthcoming.
    Philosophy Compass, EarlyView.
  •  9
    The Moral Limits of Territorial Claims in Antarctica
    Ethics and International Affairs 32 (3): 339-360. 2018.
  •  57
    The Bridge of Benevolence: Hutcheson and Mencius
    Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1): 57-72. 2013.
    The Scottish sentimentalist Francis Hutcheson and the Chinese Confucianist Mencius give benevolence (ren) a key place in their respective moral theories, as the first and foundational virtue. Leaving aside differences in style and method, my purpose in this essay is to underline this similarity by focusing on four common features: first, benevolence springs from compassion, an innate and universal feeling shared by all human beings; second, its objects are not only human beings but also animals;…Read more
  •  1
    Rethinking Land and Natural Resources, and Rights Over Them
    Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche. forthcoming.
    Download.
  •  1
    Las poblaciones callampa como expresión del derecho de necesidad
    Revista de Ciencia Politica 37 (3): 755-65. 2017.
    My aim in this article is to present the formation of poblaciones callampa in Chile during the second half of the twentieth century (especially between 1950 and 1970), as an expression of the right of necessity of thousands of homeless persons. I suggest that this social phenomenon is the germ of the consequent tomas de sitio (illegal encampments), where the requisites to take part were “to be poor, to have children, three sticks and a flag”. The individual right of necessity is the foundation o…Read more
  •  139
    Doctors with Borders? An Authority-based Approach to the Brain Drain
    South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (1): 69-77. 2017.
    According to the brain drain argument, there are good reasons for states to limit the exit of their skilled workers (more specifically, healthcare workers), because of the negative impacts this type of migration has for other members of the community from which they migrate. Some theorists criticise this argument as illiberal, while others support it and ground a duty to stay of the skilled workers on rather vague concepts like patriotic virtue, or the legitimate expectations of their state and …Read more
  •  51
    Review Article: The environmental turn in territorial rights (review)
    Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 19 (2): 221-241. 2016.
    Recent theories of territorial rights could be characterized by their growing attention to environmental concerns and resource rights (understood as the rights of jurisdiction and/or ownership over natural resources). Here I examine two: Avery Kolers’s theory of ethnogeographical plenitude, and Cara Nine’s theory of legitimate political authority over people and resources. While Kolers is a pioneer in demanding ecological sustainability as a minimum requirement for any viable theory of territori…Read more
  •  76
    Theories of Justice (edited book)
    Ashgate. 2012.
    Forty years ago, in his landmark work A Theory of Justice, John Rawls depicted a just society as a fair system of cooperation between citizens, regarded as free and equal persons. Justice, Rawls famously claimed, ought to be “the first virtue of social institutions.” Ever since then, moral and political philosophers have expanded, expounded or criticized Rawls’s main tenets, from perspectives as diverse as egalitarianism, left and right libertarianism, and the ethics of care. The most important …Read more
  •  230
    Nonhuman Animals in Adam Smith's Moral Theory
    Between the Species 13 (9). 2009.
    By giving sympathy a central role, Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) can be regarded as one of the ‘enlightened’ moral theories of the Enlightenment, insofar as it widened the scope of moral consideration beyond the traditionally restricted boundary of human beings. This, although the author himself does not seem to have been aware of this fact. In this paper, I want to focus on two aspects which I think lead to this conclusion. First, by making sentience the requisite to be taken i…Read more
  •  22
    The Volcanic Asymmetry or the Question of Permanent Sovereignty over Natural Disasters
    Journal of Political Philosophy 23 (1): 192-212. 2015.
    Why do we assign to countries rights to all the positive utilities from their natural resources, but hold them under no duty to bear costs for the negative utilities generated by those resources for those beyond their borders? In this paper I suggest that this ‘volcanic asymmetry’ has been overlooked by statist and cosmopolitan theories and that, despite of the arguments that might be given on its behalf, keeping this asymmetry requires further normative justification. I present two ways of gett…Read more
  •  476
    Veganism
    In Paul B. Thompson & David M. Kaplan (eds.), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics, Springer. forthcoming.
    Narrowly understood, veganism is the practice of excluding all animal products from one’s diet, with the exception of human milk. More broadly, veganism is not only a food ethics, but it encompasses all other areas of life. As defined by the Vegan Society when it became an established charity in the UK in 1979, veganism is best understood as “a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude – as far as is possible and practicable – all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for …Read more
  •  12
    A can of tomato juice in the sea
    Philosophy Now 107 20-21. 2015.
    John Locke’s justification of property rights starts with the idea that mixing one’s labor with previously unowned (natural) physical objects entitles one to ownership of the resulting product. American philosopher Robert Nozick presents this idea in Anarchy, State and Utopia (1974), but notes that things are not as straightforward as they might seem. On the contrary, Nozick writes, there are instances where by mixing one’s labor with something in nature, one loses one’s labor without making any…Read more
  •  19
    Shared Sovereignty over Migratory Natural Resources
    Res Publica 22 (1): 21-35. 2016.
    With growing vigor, political philosophers have started questioning the Westphalian system of states as the main actors in the international arena and, within it, the doctrine of Permanent Sovereignty over Natural Resources. In this article I add to these questionings by showing that, when it comes to migratory natural resources, i.e., migratory species, a plausible theory of territorial rights should advocate a regime of shared sovereignty among states. This means that one single entity should …Read more
  •  199
    Given the conceptual gap in the global justice debate today (where most of the talk is about the duties of the rich, but little is said about what the poor may do for themselves), in this article I reintroduce the idea of a right of necessity. I first delineate a normative framework for such a right, inspired by these historical accounts. I then offer a contemporary case where the exercise of the right of necessity would be morally legitimate according to that framework – even though illegal and…Read more
  •  24
    What the Old Right of Necessity Can Do for the Contemporary Global Poor
    Journal of Applied Philosophy 607-620. 2017.
    Given the grim global statistics of extreme poverty and socioeconomic inequalities, moral and political philosophers have focused on the duties of justice and assistance that arise therefrom. What the needy are morally permitted to do for themselves in this context has been, however, a mostly overlooked question. Reviving a medieval and early modern account of the right of necessity, I propose that a chronically deprived agent has a right to take, use and/or occupy whatever material resources ar…Read more
  •  30
    _ Source: _Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 63 - 77 At the basis of modern natural law theories, the concept of the _suum_, i.e. what belongs to the person, has received little scholarly attention despite its importance both in explaining and justifying not only the genealogy of property, but also that of morality and war. In this essay I focus on Grotius’s account of the _suum_ and examine what it is, what things it includes, what rights it gives rise to, and how it is extended in the transition from the…Read more
  •  21
    Animal Rights with a Grain of Salt (review)
    Society and Animals 21 (3): 318-319. 2013.
  •  20
    The Bridge of Benevolence: Hutcheson and Mencius (review)
    Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy. 2013.
    The Scottish sentimentalist Francis Hutcheson and the Chinese Confucianist Mencius give benevolence (ren) a key place in their respectivemoral theories, as the first and foundational virtue. Leaving aside differences in style and method, my purpose in this essay is to underline this similarity by focusing on four common features: first, benevolence springs from compassion, an innate and universal feeling shared by all human beings; second, its objects are not only human beings but also animals; …Read more
  •  199
    From the end of the twelfth century until the middle of the eighteenth century, the concept of a right of necessity –i.e. the moral prerogative of an agent, given certain conditions, to use or take someone else’s property in order to get out of his plight– was common among moral and political philosophers, who took it to be a valid exception to the standard moral and legal rules. In this essay, I analyze Samuel Pufendorf’s account of such a right, founded on the basic instinct of self-preservati…Read more
  •  30
    Avatar vs Mononoke
    Philosophy Now 85 44-46. 2011.
    "Avatar" and "Princess Mononoke" as representative of radically different positions in environmental ethics.
  •  462
    At the basis of modern natural law theories, the concept of the suum, or what belongs to the person (in Latin, his, her, its, their own), has received little scholarly attention despite its importance both in explaining and justifying not only the genealogy of property, but also that of morality and war.1 In this paper I examine Hugo Grotius's what it is, what things it includes, what rights it gives rise to and how it is extended in the transition from the state of nature to civil society. I th…Read more
  •  47
    The Right of Necessity: Moral Cosmopolitanism and Global Poverty
    Rowman & Littlefield International. 2016.
    What does the basic right to subsistence allow its holders to do for themselves when it goes unfulfilled? This book guides the reader through the morality of infringing property rights for subsistence, in a global context.