•  7
    Editors' Introduction
    philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 1 (1): 1-7. 2011.
  •  26
    Responding to Gil Anidjar's “Jesus and Monotheism” and its posing of the “Christian Question,” in this paper I return to Freud's Moses and Monotheism and its narrative of Jewish self-division. In highlighting the retroactive formation of identity, I note both its temporal dimension and the force of exclusivity it generates. This reading suggests a contrast between such theo-political communities, with their legacies of affiliation, and Christian self-absolution (the refusal of constitutive self-…Read more
  •  5
    Beyond the Law: The Daughter's Gift of Death
    Philosophy Today 43 (4): 323-335. 1999.
  •  35
    ExcerptIn “Thoughts for the Times on War and Death,” Freud defines nations as “the collective individuals of mankind” and suggests that their development recapitulates individual development.1 Like individuals, nations provide a structure for the internal organization of the passions, and, also like individuals, each nation has ideals that exhort, order, and orient its constitution and forces, imparting an image of unity that establishes borders, delimits hostilities, and guards equilibrium. In …Read more
  •  6
    By clarifying the psychoanalytic notion of sexual difference, I argue that the symbolic dimension of psychical life cannot be discarded in developing political accounts of identity formation and the status of women in the public sphere. I discuss various bridges between social reality and symbolic structure, bridges such as body, language, law, and family. I conclude that feminist attention must be redirected to the unconscious since the political cannot be localized in, or segregated to, the sp…Read more
  •  1
    Inheriting the Law: The Birth of Sexual Difference
    Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook. 1997.
    This dissertation develops a psychoanalytic model of ideology which accounts for the formation of sexual difference. I attempt to distinguish both the origin of sexually differentiated identity and the necessity of a political force at work in founding that origin. With Lacan, I locate the origin in the subjects's psychical accession to the Law of the Father, an accession that is linked to the individual establishment of a relation to the phallus as transcendental signifier. I advance a critique…Read more
  •  1
    Beyond the Law: The Daughter's Gift of Death
    Philosophy Today 43 (4): 323-335. 1999.
  •  11
    Crisscrossing Cosmopolitanism
    Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (1): 58-72. 2015.
  • Between the Psyche and the Social: Psychoanalytic Social Theory (edited book)
    with Tamsin Lorraine, Robyn Ferrell, Kelly Oliver, Kalpana Seshadri-Crooks, Frances Restuccia, E. Ann Kaplan, Catherine Peebles, Lisa Walsh, and Cynthia Willett
    Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 2001.
    Between the Psyche and the Social is the first collection that specifically features the field of psychoanalytic social theory emerging in and between psychoanalysis, feminism, postcolonial studies, and queer theory, and across the disciplines of philosophy, literary, film, and cultural studies. This collection of essays takes the psychoanalytic study of social oppression in some new directions by engaging—indeed, stirring up—unconscious fantasies and ethical tensions at the heart of social subj…Read more
  •  51
    Psychoanalytic feminism
    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. forthcoming.
  •  469
    : By clarifying the psychoanalytic notion of sexual difference (and contrasting it with a feminist analysis of gender as social reality), I argue that the symbolic dimension of psychical life cannot be discarded in developing political accounts of identity formation and the status of women in the public sphere. I discuss various bridges between social reality and symbolic structure, bridges such as body, language, law, and family. I conclude that feminist attention must be redirected to the unco…Read more
  •  1
    Beyond the father's law
    Philosophy Today 43 (4): 323-335. 1999.