•  129
    Berkeley’s Thought (review)
    Mind 113 (451): 571-575. 2004.
  • The author considers two arguments concerning the nature of space which occur in Berkeley and which he thinks are not sufficiently discussed. The first one concerns the phenomenology of space, the second the physics of space. The first one is the “mite” argument, while the second draws from Newton’s two thought experiments concerning absolute space: the “bucket” experiment and the “balls” experiment. The author’s aim is to support the idealist approach to space.
  •  7
    Mind and Body in Aristotle
    Classical Quarterly 28 (1): 105-124. 1978.
    In this paper I hope to show that a particular modern approach to Aristotle's philosophy of mind is untenable and, out of that negative discussion, develop some tentative suggestions concerning the interpretation of two famous and puzzling Aristotelian maxims. These maxims are, first, that the soul is the form of the body and, second, that perception is the reception of form without matter. The fashionable interpretation of Aristotle which I wish to criticize is the attempt to assimilate him to …Read more
  • Universals (review)
    Philosophia Christi 5 (1): 301-303. 2003.
  • Published in 1982 by CUP (pb. 2009) it discusses the forms of materialism then current, including Davidson, early Rorty, but concentrating on Smart and Armstrong, and arguing that central state materialism fails to give a better 'occurrent' account of conscious states than does behaviourism/functionalism, as Armstrong claims. The book starts with a version of the 'knowledge argument' and ends with a chapter claiming that our conception of matter/the physical is more problematic than our concepti…Read more
  •  11
    Gareth Moore's Radical Wittgensteinianism
    New Blackfriars 84 (989-990): 353-360. 2003.
  •  6
    This book presents a strong case for substance dualism and offers a comprehensive defense of the knowledge argument, showing that materialism cannot accommodate or explain the 'hard problem' of consciousness. Bringing together the discussion of reductionism and semantic vagueness in an original and illuminating way, Howard Robinson argues that non-fundamental levels of ontology are best treated by a conceptualist account, rather than a realist one. In addition to discussing the standard versions…Read more
  •  15
    Contemporary Dualism: A Defense (edited book)
    Routledge. 2013.
    Ontological materialism, in its various forms, has become the orthodox view in contemporary philosophy of mind. This book provides a variety of defenses of mind-body dualism, and shows that a thoroughgoing ontological materialism cannot be sustained. The contributions are intended to show that, at the very least, ontological dualism constitutes a philosophically respectable alternative to the monistic views that currently dominate thought about the mind-body relation
  • Tyler Burge és a szociális externalizmus
    Magyar Filozofiai Szemle 3. 2005.
  • Book Review (review)
    Philosophia Christi 5 (1): 301-303. 2003.
  •  69
    In recent years, a significant number of philosophers from an orthodox analytic background have begun to advocate theories of composite objects, which they say are strikingly similar to Aristotle’s hylomorphism. These theories emphasize the importance of structure, or organization—which they say is closely connected to Aristotle’s notion of form—in defining what it is for a composite to be a genuine object. The reality of these structures is closely connected with the fact that they are held to …Read more
  •  1
    The Self and Time
    In Peter van Inwagen & Dean Zimmerman (eds.), Persons: Human and Divine, Clarendon Press. 2007.
  •  32
    'Abstract ideas' and immaterialism
    History of European Ideas 7 (6): 617-622. 1986.
    Berkeley confidently asserts the connection between his attack on abstract ideas and immaterialism, But how the connection works has puzzled modern commentators. I construct an argument resting on the imagist theory of thought which connects anti-ionism and immaterialism and try to show that it is berkeleian. I then suggest that, Without the mistaken imagist theory, A similar and still interesting argument can be constructed to the weaker conclusion that matter is essentially unknowable
  •  3
    Two Berkelian Arguments about the Nature of Space
    In Timo Airaksinen & Bertil Belfrage (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later, Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 79-90. 2011.
    I consider two arguments about the nature of space that occur in George Berkeley which I think are not sufficiently discussed. The first concerns the phenomenology of space, the second its physics. The first is the "mite" argument and the second concerns Isaac Newton's two thought experiments about absolute space, the "bucket" thought experiment and the "balls" thought experiment. The former suggests that there is no such thing as objective size. Berkeley's position is more confusing on the seco…Read more
  •  34
    Substance dualism and its rationale
    In Richard Swinburne (ed.), Free Will and Modern Science, Oup/british Academy. 2011.
    Substance dualism is the view that humans are essentially immaterial souls, and that conscious events are events in that soul. This chapter considers the arguments for and against this view. It argues that such questions as ‘Would I have existed if my mother's egg had been fertilized by a different though genetically identical sperm from my father?’ must have a sharp yes-or-no answer, but that they would not have a sharp answer if being me consisted simply of being made of similar genetic materi…Read more
  •  13
    Vision: Variations on Some Berkeleian Themes (review)
    Philosophical Review 105 (1): 97-99. 1996.
    Vision consists of four essays: “Seeing distance,” “Size,” “Perceptual inference,” and “A Gibsonian alternative?” The continuous thread is the Berkeleian treatment of the perception of spatial properties, particularly in connection with what is and is not “immediately perceived.” The first two essays are closely connected with specific Berkeleian arguments and modern responses to them. The second two essays deal more generally with modern discussions by psychologists of whether visual perception…Read more
  •  25
  •  5
    The general form of the argument for berkeleian idealism
    In John Foster & Howard Robinson (eds.), Essays on Berkeley: A Tercentennial Celebration, Oxford University Press. pp. 163--186. 1985.
  •  79
    Essays on Berkeley: A Tercentennial Celebration (edited book)
    with John Foster
    Oxford University Press. 1985.
    Marking the tercentenary of Berkeley's birth, this collection of previously unpublished essays covers such Berkeleian topics as: imagination, experience, and possibility; the argument against material substance; the physical world; idealism; science; the self; action and inaction; beauty; and the general good. Among the contributors are: Christopher Peacocke, Ernest Sosa, Margaret Wilson, C.C.W. Taylor, and J.O. Urmson.
  •  257
    Perception
    Routledge. 1994.
    Questions about perception remain some of the most difficult and insoluble in both epistemology and in the philosophy of mind. This controversial but highly accessible introduction to the area explores the philosophical importance of those questions by re-examining what had until recent times been the most popular theory of perception - the sense-datum theory. Howard Robinson surveys the history of the arguments for and against the theory from Descartes to Husserl. He then shows that the objecti…Read more
  •  97
    Objections to Physicalism (edited book)
    Oxford University Press. 1993.
    Physicalism has, over the past twenty years, become almost an orthodoxy, especially in the philosophy of mind. Many philosophers, however, feel uneasy about this development, and this volume is intended as a collective response to it. Together these papers, written by philosophers from Britain, the United States, and Australasia, show that physicalism faces enormous problems in every area in which it is discussed. The contributors not only investigate the well-known difficulties that physicalism…Read more
  •  41
    Mind and Body in Aristotle
    Classical Quarterly 28 (01): 105-. 1978.
    In this paper I hope to show that a particular modern approach to Aristotle's philosophy of mind is untenable and, out of that negative discussion, develop some tentative suggestions concerning the interpretation of two famous and puzzling Aristotelian maxims. These maxims are, first, that the soul is the form of the body and, second, that perception is the reception of form without matter. The fashionable interpretation of Aristotle which I wish to criticize is the attempt to assimilate him to …Read more
  •  86
  •  20
    12 Why Frank Should Not Have Jilted Mary
    In Edmond Wright (ed.), The Case for Qualia, Mit Press. pp. 223. 2008.