•  66
    'The power to develop dispositions': Revisiting John Dewey's democratic claims for education
    Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1): 149-163. 2008.
    This article reviews John Dewey and Our Educational Prospect, A Critical Engagement with Dewey's Democracy and Education, edited and spearheaded by David T. Hansen, with contributions by Gert Biesta, Reba N. Page, Larry A. Hickman, Naoko Saito, Gary D. Fenstermacher, Herbert M. Kliebard, Sharon Fieman-Nemser and Elizabeth Minnich. This review will not only praise and evaluate the merits of this book, but will also attempt to frame this new study of Dewey within the challenges that continue to en…Read more
  •  44
    Willed Forgetfulness: The Arts, Education and the Case for Unlearning
    Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4): 415-430. 2013.
    Established scholarship in arts education is invariably related to theories of development founded on notions of multiple intelligence and experiential learning. Yet when contemporary arts practice is retraced on a philosophical horizon, one begins to engage with other cases for learning. This state of affairs reveals art’s inherent paradox where the expectation of learning is substituted by forms of unlearning. This paper begins to approach unlearning through the tension between art and educati…Read more
  •  32
    This essay looks at the relationship between formative aesthetics, language and the historical anticipation that begins with Antonio Gramsci's discussion of Kant's idea of noumenon. In Gramsci both education (as formazione) and aesthetics stem from a concern for power in terms of the hegemonic relations that are inherent to history as a political horizon. The title cites Gramci's suggestion that Kant's noumenon should be read as a proviso set apart by a ‘relative ignorance’ of reality [‘relativa…Read more
  •  27
    Art’s False “Ease”: Form, Meaning and a Problematic Pedagogy
    Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (4): 433-450. 2014.
    This paper argues that in foregoing the questions that emerge from the dialectical relationship between form and meaning, an intrinsic fallacy mistakes the relationship between the arts and education for a simplistic mechanism of signification—a false “ease”—where empty forms are supposedly given meaning by ethical and aesthetic givens as if the pedagogy of art were analogous to an empty room that was (or still needs to be) inhabited. Art’s false “ease” presents a tautology that presumes the rel…Read more
  •  11
    Response to Walter Gershon’s Review of Art’s Way Out
    Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (1): 109-113. 2015.
    Art’s Way Out invites readers to examine how what we call “art” enters a conditioned relationship with the polity that leaves the occasion of education and the condition of culture in a quandary that is at best inept and at worse oppressive. There are two reasons for this: because any relationship between art and education is aporetic by dint of how they have emerged in between their respective autonomous and heteronomous forms of being and knowing; and because in the volatility of representatio…Read more
  •  6
    This essay starts off with a modern-day court jester praising a Pope. Fo presents us with an historic moment: Luciani scandalises his Church by calling God “Mother.” With utmost seriousness, Fo appreciates the Pope’s kindness and warmth by which the artist perceives a way of scandalising the world out of complacency. In their idealised and situated presentations of the world, the sacred and the profane return the necessary to the contingent as moments of equal attention and distraction. Likewise…Read more
  •  3
    This article reviews John Dewey and Our Educational Prospect, A Critical Engagement with Dewey's Democracy and Education, edited and spearheaded by David T. Hansen, with contributions by Gert Biesta, Reba N. Page, Larry A. Hickman, Naoko Saito, Gary D. Fenstermacher, Herbert M. Kliebard, Sharon Fieman-Nemser and Elizabeth Minnich. This review will not only praise and evaluate the merits of this book, but will also attempt to frame this new study of Dewey within the challenges that continue to en…Read more
  • Gramsci and Education
    with Paula Allman, Estanislao Antelo, Ursula Apitzsch, Stanley Aronowitz, Joseph A. Buttigieg, Diana Coben, Gustavo Fischman, Benedetto Fontana, Henry A. Giroux, Jerrold L. Kachur, D. W. Livingstone, Peter McLaren, Peter Mayo, Attilio Monasta, W. J. Morgan, Raymond A. Morrow, Silvia Serra, and Carlos Alberto Torres
    Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 2002.
    Antonio Gramsci is one of the major social and political theorists of the 20th century whose work has had an enormous influence on several fields, including educational theory and practice. Gramsci and Education demonstrates the relevance of Antonio Gramsci's thought for contemporary educational debates. The essays are written by scholars located in different parts of the world, a number of whom are well known internationally for their contributions to Gramscian scholarship and/or educational re…Read more
  • Avant-Nostalgia an Excuse to Pause
    with Jeremy Diggle and Unit for the Study of Philosophy in Art
    . 2002.