• Kant and the Faculty of Feeling (edited book)
    Cambridge University Press. 2017.
    Kant stated that there are three mental faculties: cognition, feeling, and desire. The faculty of feeling has received the least scholarly attention, despite its importance in Kant's broader thought, and this volume of new essays is the first to present multiple perspectives on a number of important questions about it. Why does Kant come to believe that feeling must be described as a separate faculty? What is the relationship between feeling and cognition, on the one hand, and desire, on the oth…Read more
  •  12
    Counterfactual Situations and Moral Worth
    Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4). 2013.
    What is the relevance to praiseworthiness and blameworthiness of what one would have done in other, counterfactual circumstances? I defend a moderate form of actualism: what one would have done is important, but less so than what one actually does.
  •  24
    Effort Expended, Effort Required, and the Theory of the Good
    Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 49 83-110. 2008.
    One of the factors that contributes to an agent’s praiseworthiness and blameworthiness - his or her moral worth – is effort. On the one hand, agents who act effortlessly seem to have high moral worth. On the other hand, agents who act effortfully seem to have high moral worth as well. I explain this pair of intuitions and explore the contour of our views about cases in between them. This paper uses conceptual graphs for clarity and, in additional work I have done on value theory, as arguments. C…Read more
  •  5
    Kant on Mind, Action, and Ethics by Julian Wuerth
    Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1): 175-176. 2016.
    This textually well-supported book takes seriously Kant’s corpus as a system, claiming that devoted attention to the whole makes each individual work in turn more intelligible, consistent, and compelling. Wuerth claims that a key to Kant’s system is Kant’s account of the self or soul. For Wuerth, Kant’s self is a simple, noumenal substance that possesses powers by which it effects accidents. This is against the familiar interpretation, associated with Patricia Kitcher, Henry Allison, Robert Pipp…Read more
  •  109
    Enhancing autonomy in paid surrogacy
    with Jennifer Damelio
    Bioethics 22 (5). 2008.
    The gestational surrogate – and her economic and educational vulnerability in particular – is the focus of many of the most persistent worries about paid surrogacy. Those who employ her, and those who broker and organize her services, usually have an advantage over her in resources and information. That asymmetry exposes her to the possibility of exploitation and abuse. Accordingly, some argue for banning paid surrogacy. Others defend legal permission on grounds of surrogate autonomy, but often …Read more
  •  109
    The Paradox of Moral Worth
    Journal of Philosophy 101 (9). 2004.
  •  154
    Effort and Moral Worth
    Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1): 89-109. 2010.
    One of the factors that contributes to an agent’s praiseworthiness and blameworthiness — his or her moral worth — is effort. On the one hand, agents who act effortlessly seem to have high moral worth. On the other hand, agents who act effortfully seem to have high moral worth as well. I explore and explain this pair of intuitions and the contour of our views about associated cases.
  •  225
    Kant's Taxonomy of the Emotions
    Kantian Review 6 109-128. 2002.
    If there is to be any progress in the debate about what sort of positive moral status Kant can give the emotions, we need a taxonomy of the terms Kant uses for these concepts. It used to be thought that Kant had little room for emotions in his ethics. In the past three decades, Marcia Baron, Paul Guyer, Barbara Herman, Nancy Sherman, Allen Wood and others have argued otherwise. Contrary to what a cursory reading of the Groundwork may indicate, Kant thinks the emotions play an important role in t…Read more
  •  27
    Search, Seizure, and Immunity: Second-Order Normative Authority and Rights
    with Stephen E. Henderson
    Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (2): 108-125. 2013.
    A paradigmatic aspect of a paradigmatic kind of right is that the rights holder is the only one who can alienate it. When individuals waive rights, the normative source of that waiving is normally taken to be the individual herself. This moral feature?immunity?is usually in the background of discussions about rights. We bring it into the foreground here, with specific attention to a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision, Kentucky v. King (2011), concerning search and seizure rights. An entailment o…Read more
  •  28
    Genetic enhancements and expectations
    Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (7): 433-435. 2009.
    Next SectionSome argue that genetic enhancements and environmental enhancements are not importantly different: environmental enhancements such as private schools and chess lessons are simply the old-school way to have a designer baby. I argue that there is an important distinction between the two practices—a distinction that makes state restrictions on genetic enhancements more justifiable than state restrictions on environmental enhancements. The difference is that parents have no settled expec…Read more
  •  51
    Moral Enhancement and Self-Subversion Objections
    Neuroethics 7 (3): 275-286. 2014.
    Some say moral bioenhancements are urgent and necessary; others say they are misguided or simply will not work. I examine a class of arguments claiming that moral bioenhancements are problematic because they are self-subverting. On this view, trying to make oneself or others more moral, at least through certain means, can itself be immoral, or at least worse than the alternatives. The thought here is that moral enhancements might fail not for biological reasons, but for specifically morally self…Read more
  •  17
    Unit 731 and moral repair
    with Doug Hickey, Scarllet SiJia Li, Celia Morrison, Richard Schulz, and Michelle Thiry
    Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4): 270-276. 2017.
  •  1
    The Factors of Moral Worth
    Dissertation, Yale University. 2003.
    Actions are right or wrong; agents are good or bad. Most ethicists are interested in the first dimension. My work is about the second. Factors relevant to the first dimension include, for example, the action's consequences and whether the action is a harm. But many other morally compelling factors are neglected if we focus exclusively on right and wrong---factors such as motives, intentions, effort, and character. These are among the factors of a second dimension, moral worth: the goodness or ba…Read more
  •  41
    Counterfactual Situations and Moral Worth
    Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (3): 294-319. 2014.
    What is the relevance to praiseworthiness and blameworthiness of what one would have done in other, counterfactual circumstances? I defend a moderate form of actualism: what one would have done is important, but less so than what one actually does