•  33
    Chesterton in Poland
    The Chesterton Review 11 (3): 321-331. 1985.
  •  33
    Introduction: “The Need for Repose”
    with Jeffrey M. Perl, Mita Choudhury, Andrea R. Jain, and Jeffrey J. Kripal
    Common Knowledge 15 (2): 157-163. 2009.
    This essay introduces the second installment of a symposium in Common Knowledge called “Apology for Quietism.” This introductory piece concerns the sociology of quietism and why, given the supposed quietude of quietists, there is such a thing at all. Dealing first with the “activist” Susan Sontag's attraction to the “quietist” Simone Weil, it then concentrates on the “activist” William Empson's attraction to the Buddha and to Buddhist quietism, with special reference to Empson's lost manuscript …Read more
  •  16
    Quietism and polemic a dialectical story
    Common Knowledge 15 (2): 181-196. 2009.
    Although they have a religious origin, the terms quietist and quietism have generally been used in the anglophone world in the context created by the French Revolution, which made them expressions of political abuse. Examination of classic instances of their use shows that in fact they were terms of psychological abuse, signs that men and women of political commitment could not understand, let alone accept, others who were not committed to one side or other in the revolutionary struggle. This pa…Read more
  •  13
    Apology for Quietism: A Sotto Voce Symposium Part 2
    with Jeffrey M. Perl, Mita Choudhury, Andrea R. Jain, and Jeffrey J. Kripal
    Common Knowledge 15 (2): 157-163. 2009.
  •  12
    Heidegger as a Post-Darwinian Philosopher
    Philosophy 88 (3): 387-410. 2013.
    Heidegger responded to Darwin's displacement of the Created Universe by seeking value in a new materiality. His 1936 lecture The Origin of the Work of Art spelt out the need to get away from an Aristotelian concept of matter perpetuated by Aquinas and frame an approach more appropriate to a post-Darwinian age. The argument is not that Heidegger was a Darwinist or an evolutionist. It is that he responded to what Dewey called
  •  2
    The Sad Rider
    Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 6 (2): 141-153. 2015.
  • Motherland: A Philosophical History of Russia
    Studies in East European Thought 59 (3): 255-257. 2007.