•  3
    A long view of cumulative technological culture
    with R. Alexander Bentley
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 43. 2020.
    We agree that the emergence of cumulative technological culture was tied to nonsocial cognitive skills, namely, technical-reasoning skills, which allowed humans to constantly acquire and improve information. Our concern is with a reading of the history of cumulative technological culture that is based largely on modern experiments in simulated settings and less on phenomena crucial to the long-term dynamics of cultural evolution.
  •  6
    Where have you gone, Joseph scaliger?
    Modern Intellectual History 13 (1): 261-271. 2016.
  • The Status Designation [Persis, Tes Epigones]
    with John F. Oates
    Yale University Press. 1963.
  •  22
    The learning and transmission of hierarchical cultural recipes
    with Alex Mesoudi
    Biological Theory 3 (1): 63-72. 2008.
    Archaeologists have proposed that behavioral knowledge of a tool can be conceptualized as a “recipe”—a unit of cultural transmission that combines the preparation of raw materials, construction, and use of the tool, and contingency plans for repair and maintenance. This parallels theories in cognitive psychology that behavioral knowledge is hierarchically structured—sequences of actions are divided into higher level, partially independent subunits. Here we use an agent-based simulation model to …Read more
  •  17
    Pelopid History and the Plot of Iphigenia in Tauris
    Classical Quarterly 38 (01): 98-. 1988.
    The plot of Iphigenia in Tauris is usually thought to be Euripides' own invention. Its basic assumption can be found in Proclus' summary of the Cypria, viz. that a deer was substituted for Iphigenia during the sacrifice at Aulis and that she herself was removed to the land of the Tauri. Her later rescue by Orestes and Pylades, however, cannot be traced with probability to any work of art or literature earlier than Euripides' play. In this play, in which Orestes recognizes and then saves the sist…Read more
  •  6
    The Socratic Paradoxes and the Greek Mind
    Philosophical Quarterly 21 (82): 74-74. 1971.
  •  18
    Xenophanes, Aeschylus, and the doctrine of primeval brutishness
    Classical Quarterly 35 (02): 264-. 1985.
    The belief that primitive men lived like beasts and that civilisation developed out of these brutal origins is found in numerous ancient authors, both Greek and Latin. It forms part of certain theories about the beginnings of culture current in late antiquity. These are notoriously difficult to trace to their sources, but they already existed in some form in the fifth century b.c. One idea common to these theories is that of progress, and for this reason a fragment of Xenophanes is sometimes cit…Read more
  •  23
    Archaeology and cultural macroevolution
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4): 359-360. 2006.
    Given the numerous parallels between the archaeological and paleontological records, it is not surprising to find a considerable fit between macroevolutionary approaches and methods used in biology – for example, cladistics and clade-diversity measures – and some of those that have long been used in archaeology – for example, seriation. Key, however, is recognizing that this methodological congruence is illusory in terms of how evolution has traditionally been viewed in biology and archaeology. …Read more
  •  37
    Mapping collective behavior in the big-data era
    with R. Alexander Bentley and William A. Brock
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1): 63-76. 2014.
    The behavioral sciences have flourished by studying how traditional and/or rational behavior has been governed throughout most of human history by relatively well-informed individual and social learning. In the online age, however, social phenomena can occur with unprecedented scale and unpredictability, and individuals have access to social connections never before possible. Similarly, behavioral scientists now have access to “big data” sets – those from Twitter and Facebook, for example – that…Read more
  •  11
    More on maps, terrains, and behaviors
    with R. Alexander Bentley and William A. Brock
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1): 105-119. 2014.
    The behavioral sciences have flourished by studying how traditional and/or rational behavior has been governed throughout most of human history by relatively well-informed individual and social learning. In the online age, however, social phenomena can occur with unprecedented scale and unpredictability, and individuals have access to social connections never before possible. Similarly, behavioral scientists now have access to “big data” sets – those from Twitter and Facebook, for example – that…Read more
  •  8
    Mapping multiple drivers of human obesity
    with R. Alexander Bentley
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40. 2017.
  •  16
    Victorian Piety practiced
    Modern Intellectual History 5 (1): 153-163. 2008.
    For some time, there has been reason for imagining that we live in neo-Victorian times. We are awash in restless evangelicals, profligate of stern and apocalyptic advice. We have had praying leaders who imagine that foreigners, usually with beards, require reform and invasion. Celts threaten secession and the Union is extolled. There is much talk of families, education, and the anxieties of class. Our novels grow long and vexed, and even have plots. Historians seek the common reader and write me…Read more
  •  8
    Xenophanes, Aeschylus, and the doctrine of primeval brutishness
    Classical Quarterly 35 (2): 264-277. 1985.
    The belief that primitive men lived like beasts and that civilisation developed out of these brutal origins is found in numerous ancient authors, both Greek and Latin. It forms part of certain theories about the beginnings of culture current in late antiquity. These are notoriously difficult to trace to their sources, but they already existed in some form in the fifth century b.c. One idea common to these theories is that of progress, and for this reason a fragment of Xenophanes is sometimes cit…Read more
  •  8
    Pelopid History and the Plot of Iphigenia in Tauris
    Classical Quarterly 38 (1): 98-115. 1988.
    The plot of Iphigenia in Tauris is usually thought to be Euripides' own invention. Its basic assumption can be found in Proclus' summary of the Cypria, viz. that a deer was substituted for Iphigenia during the sacrifice at Aulis and that she herself was removed to the land of the Tauri. Her later rescue by Orestes and Pylades, however, cannot be traced with probability to any work of art or literature earlier than Euripides' play. In this play, in which Orestes recognizes and then saves the sist…Read more
  •  45
    Chesterton and Paganism
    The Chesterton Review 16 (3/4): 181-201. 1990.
  •  31
    "Nazareth" magazine launched
    The Chesterton Review 18 (1): 145-145. 1992.
  •  37
    Formation of The White Horse Press
    The Chesterton Review 18 (4): 640-641. 1992.
  •  29
    Chesterton, a Critic of the New Age
    The Chesterton Review 19 (3): 440-442. 1993.
  •  28
    A Reply to Philip Jenkins
    The Chesterton Review 23 (4): 549-552. 1997.
  •  9
    Virtue and Politics: The Example of Philip Hart
    with Daniel Putman
    Public Affairs Quarterly 12 (2): 169-178. 1998.
  •  7
  • The Worlds of American Intellectual History (edited book)
    with Joel Isaac, James T. Kloppenberg, and Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen
    Oxford University Press USA. 2017.
    The essays in this book demonstrate the breadth and vitality of American intellectual history. Their core theme is the diversity of both American intellectual life and of the frameworks that we must use to make sense of that diversity. The Worlds of American Intellectual History has at its heart studies of American thinkers. Yet it follows these thinkers and their ideas as they have crossed national, institutional, and intellectual boundaries. The volume explores ways in which American ideas hav…Read more