•  58
    Perception and Knowledge in Plato's Theaetetus
    Philosophy Compass 11 (3): 160-167. 2016.
    In this paper, I examine several key issues relating to the definition of knowledge as perception in the first part of Plato's Theaetetus. I begin by explaining the workings of the ‘secret doctrine’ of perception, which is introduced in order to support the idea that perception is incorrigible, and then turn to examine the two refutations of the definition of knowledge as perception which appear at the end of the first part of the Theaetetus. I shall present and explain distinct lines of interpr…Read more
  •  1
    This volume brings together eleven papers written by specialists of ancient philosophy, focusing on philosophical polemics from the Classical to the Roman period, by way of Hellenistic philosophy.
  •  37
    Judgment, Logos, and Knowledge in Plato's Theaetetus
    Philosophy Compass 11 (5): 246-255. 2016.
    In this second installment on the Theaetetus, I discuss Theaetetus' second and third definitions of knowledge, namely, ‘true judgment’ and then ‘true judgment with the addition of an account’. I offer a brief description of Socrates' intricate examination of these suggestions, concentrating especially on the discussion of false judgment and that of the so-called ‘Dream Theory’. I then proceed to map different lines of interpretation for these passages that have been offered by scholars writing i…Read more
  •  24
    Review of Catalin Partenie (ed.), Plato's Myths (review)
    Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (10). 2009.
  •  33
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print
  •  302
    Traces of good in plotinus's philosophy of nature: Ennead VI.7.1-14
    Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2): 161-180. 2011.
    Ennead VI.7, the thirty-eighth treatise in order of composition, opens with a sustained attack on the idea that the form and function of various animal organs are the result of divine forethought and deliberation. In the first three chapters of the treatise, Plotinus argues that no formulation of the notion of deliberation can be made consistent with the facts about the nature of the intelligible2 and its priority over the physical world. As has been noted in the past,3 Plotinus's arguments agai…Read more