•  881
    A Multiform Desire
    Dissertation, Uppsala University. 2013.
    This dissertation is a study of appetite in Plato’s Timaeus, Republic and Phaedrus. In recent research is it often suggested that Plato considers appetite (i) to pertain to the essential needs of the body, (ii) to relate to a distinct set of objects, e.g. food or drink, and (iii) to cause behaviour aiming at sensory pleasure. Exploring how the notion of appetite, directly and indirectly, connects with Plato’s other purposes in these dialogues, this dissertation sets out to evaluate these ideas. …Read more
  •  379
    The Legacy of Hermes: Deception and Dialectic in Plato’s Cratylus
    Journal of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1): 26-58. 2016.
    Against the background of a conventionalist theory, and staged as a defense of a naturalistic notion of names and naming, the critique of language developed in Plato’s Cratylus does not only propose that human language, in contrast to the language of the gods, is bound to the realm of myth and lie. The dialogue also concludes by offering a set of reasons to think that knowledge of reality is not within the reach of our words. Interpretations of the dialogue’s long etymological sections often neg…Read more
  •  254
    Plato’s Protagoras contains, among other things, three short but puzzling remarks on the media of philosophy. First, at 328e5–329b1, Plato makes Socrates worry that long speeches, just like books, are deceptive, because they operate in a discursive mode void of questions and answers. Second, at 347c3–348a2, Socrates argues that discussion of poetry is a presumptuous affair, because, the poems’ message, just like the message of any written text, cannot be properly examined if the author is not pr…Read more
  •  252
    The Science of Philosophy: Discourse and Deception in Plato’s Sophist
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2): 221-237. 2018.
    At 252e1 to 253c9 in Plato’s Sophist, the Eleatic Visitor explains why philosophy is a science. Like the art of grammar, philosophical knowledge corresponds to a generic structure of discrete kinds and is acquired by systematic analysis of how these kinds intermingle. In the literature, the Visitor’s science is either understood as an expression of a mature and authentic platonic metaphysics, or as a sophisticated illusion staged to illustrate the seductive lure of sophistic deception. By showin…Read more
  •  137
    Introduction
    In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry, Springer. pp. 1-8. 2017.
    Guided by the bold ambition to reexamine the nature of philosophy, questions about the foundations and origins of Plato’s dialogues have in recent years gained a new and important momentum. In the wake of the seminal work of Andrea Nightingale and especially her book Genres in Dialogue from 1995, Plato’s texts have come to be reconsidered in terms of their compositional and intergeneric fabric. Supplementing important research on the argumentative structures of the dialogues, it has been argued …Read more
  •  44
    Language, search and aporia in plato’s seventh letter
    THE JOURNAL OF SAPIENTIAL WISDOM AND PHILOSOPHY (SOPHIA PERENNIS) 7 (2): 31-62. 2010.
    This article investigates the relation between Language and Being as it is articulated in the so-called philosophical digression of Plato‘s alleged Seventh Letter. Here the author of the letter claims, in contrast to the testimony of Plato‘s many dialogues, that there has never been and there will never be any written word on Plato‘s philosophy; and in addition, as if this was not sufficiently perplexing, he goes on to explain that the matters of philosophy do in fact not admit of verbal express…Read more
  •  41
    Sophistry and political philosophy: Protagoras’ challenge to Socrates (review)
    Contemporary Political Theory 17 (S2): 98-101. 2018.
    Review of Robert C. Bartlett's Sophistry and Political Philosophy: Protagoras’ Challenge to Socrates, University of Chicago Press, 2016
  •  40
    Plato on Necessity and Disorder
    Frontiers of Philosophy in China (BRILL) 8 (4): 546-565. 2013.
    In the Timaeus, Plato makes a distinction between reason and necessity. This distinction is often accounted for as a distinction between two types of causation: purpose oriented causation and mechanistic causation. While reason is associated with the soul and taken to bring about its effects with the good and the beautiful as the end, necessity is understood in terms of a set of natural laws pertaining to material things. In this paper I shall suggest that there are reasons to reconsider the lat…Read more
  •  36
    This book presents a thorough study and an up to date anthology of Plato’s Protagoras. International authors' papers contribute to the task of understanding how Plato introduced and negotiated a new type of intellectual practice – called philosophy – and the strategies that this involved. They explore Plato’s dialogue, looking at questions of how philosophy and sophistry relate, both on a methodological and on a thematic level. While many of the contributing authors argue for a sharp distinction…Read more
  •  29
    Socrates’ Failure: Language and Lies in Plato’s Apology
    In Haraldsen Vivil Valvik, Olof Pettersson & Tvedt Oda E. Wiese (eds.), Readings of Plato's Apology of Socrates Defending the Philosophical Life, Lexington. pp. 137-154. 2018.
    Plato’s Apology opens with a distinction. By opposing his accusers’ deceitfulness to his own blunt truthfulness, Socrates distinguishes a philosophical manner of speech from its politico-forensic counterpart. This can be said to culminate at 17d3, where Socrates claims to be a stranger (xenos) to the manner of speech—the lexis (17d3)—of the court. He asks to be allowed to talk with his own voice (phônh), in his own way (tropos, cf. 17d5–18a3) and without making fine speeches (“kekalliepêmenous g…Read more
  •  18
    Readings of Plato's Apology of Socrates: Defending the Philosophical Life (edited book)
    with Vivil Valvik Haraldsen and Oda E. Wiese Tvedt
    Lexington. 2017.
    Contributors to this volume focus on the character of Socrates as the embodiment of philosophy, employing this as a starting point for exploring various themes exposed in the Apology. These include the relation of philosophy to democracy, rhetoric, politics, or society in general, and the overarching question of what comprises the philosophic life.
  •  10
    Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry (edited book)
    with Vigdis Songe-Møller
    Springer. 2017.
    This book presents a thorough study and an up to date anthology of Plato’s Protagoras. International authors' papers contribute to the task of understanding how Plato introduced and negotiated a new type of intellectual practice – called philosophy – and the strategies that this involved. They explore Plato’s dialogue, looking at questions of how philosophy and sophistry relate, both on a methodological and on a thematic level.
  •  3
    Readings of Plato’s Apology of Socrates (edited book)
    with Vivil Valvik Haraldsen and Oda E. Wiese Tvedt
    Lexington Books. 2018.
    In Plato’s Apology of Socrates we see a philosopher in collision with his society—a society he nonetheless claims to have benefited through his philosophic activity. It has often been asked why democratic Athens condemned a philosopher of Socrates' character to death. This anthology examines the contribution made by Plato’s Apology of Socrates to our understanding of the character of Socrates as well as of the conception of philosophy Plato attributes to him. The 11 chapters offer complementary …Read more
  • The Science of Philosophy in advance
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy. forthcoming.
  • Readings of Plato's Apology of Socrates: Defending the Philosophical Life (edited book)
    with Vivil Valvik Haraldsen and Oda E. Wiese Tvedt
    Lexington Books. 2017.
    Contributors to this volume focus on the character of Socrates as the embodiment of philosophy, employing this as a starting point for exploring various themes exposed in the Apology. These include the relation of philosophy to democracy, rhetoric, politics, or society in general, and the overarching question of what comprises the philosophic life.