•  11
    Seeing Darkness, Hearing Silence
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (1): 81-99. 2020.
    This essay addresses the following questions: How does the meta-sensory function of koine aisthesis relate to its other functions? How can a meta-level arise from the immanence of sensation? Can we give an account of meta-sensation that doesn’t assume a transcendental plane? My contention is that the representationalist model doesn’t apply to Aristotle and that Aristotle offers an alternative that is worth exploring. I propose to interpret the meta-sensory power of the koine aisthesis in terms o…Read more
  •  3
    Jussi Backman, Complicated Presence: Heidegger and the Postmetaphysical Unity of Being (review)
    Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual 9 192-201. 2019.
  •  2
    Aquinas on Matter and Form and the Elements (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 53 (3): 685-685. 2000.
    This book offers a translation of Aquinas’s De Principiis Naturae and De Mixione Elementorum accompanied by a continuous commentary, followed by two essays: “Elements in the Composition of Physical Substances”, and “The Elements in Aquinas and the Elements Today”. The unity of the volume rests in the question of the composition of natural things.
  •  16
    Masks and the Space of Play
    Research in Phenomenology 48 (1): 119-146. 2018.
    _ Source: _Volume 48, Issue 1, pp 119 - 146 Masks are devices and symbols. In the first instance, they are artifacts that allow opposite poles to take each other’s place. They split the world into appearance and reality, manifest and repressed, sacred and profane. In this sense, they are dualistic. But by so doing they invert these terms. In this sense, they are dialectical. In the second instance, they exemplify doubt about people’s identities and the veracity of their words; they denote duplic…Read more
  •  65
    Anne O’Byrne. Natality and Finitude (review)
    philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 2 (1): 105-108. 2012.
  • Contingency is encountered in the world, but the nature of such an "encounter" is ontologically obscure. In particular, contingency seems to commit us to granting existence to "possibilities" in order to distinguish the sphere of mere non-being from the sphere of that which is not, but "could be." ;Through detailed analyses of Aristotle and Duns Scotus this dissertation departs from the dominant contemporary interpretation of modalities , according to which Scotus rejected the so-called "princip…Read more
  •  53
    Between Past and Future: Aristotle and the Division of Time
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2): 317-329. 2009.
    Time prevents being from forming a totality. Whenever there is time fragmentation and multiplicity occur. Yet, there also ought to be continuity since it is thesame being that was, is and will be. Because of time, being must be both identical and different. This is the key problem that Aristotle attempts to resolve in his discussion of time in Book IV of the Physics. This essay considers three privileged notions: limit, number and ecstasies on which Aristotle relies at crucial moments of his inq…Read more
  •  26
    Achard of Saint Victor and Primordial Plurality
    Saint Anselm Journal 5 (2): 1-18. 2008.
    The conditions for an investigation of Achard of Saint Victor (who died in 1171) have only recently become available. Now the discovery of a very significant turn in the history of twelfth-century thought is open to examination. The author focuses on Achard’s claim concerning an ontologically primary plurality. In the very title of Achard’s main treatise, De unitate Dei et pluralitate creaturarum, it is the word ‘et’ that joins together unity and plurality, expressing the core of Achard’s ontolo…Read more
  •  964
    The Irony of Chance
    International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1): 15-28. 2003.
    The diversity of interpretations of Aristotle’s treatment of chance and luck springs from an apparent contradiction between the claims that “chance events are for the sake of something” and that “chance events are not for the sake of their outcome.” Chance seems to entail the denial of an end. Yet Aristotle systematically refers it to what is for the sake of an end. This paper suggests that, in order to give an account of chance, a reference to “per accidens causes” is not sufficient. Chance occ…Read more
  •  35
  •  40
    Aristotle’s Criticism of Plato’s Republic (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 52 (3): 709-710. 1999.
    Aristotle dedicates the first chapters of Politics B to a critical examination of Plato’s Kallipolis from the standpoint of the end of the city and the means to achieve it. Many modern commentaries have depicted Aristotle’s critique as unfair to Plato. Through a detailed philosophical commentary, Mayhew attempts to demonstrate on the contrary that “Aristotle is right, and his modern critics wrong”.
  •  17
    The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 57 (3): 655-656. 2004.
    Peter King’s essay on Scotus’s metaphysics belongs to the first type. King introduces the reader in a clear and lively manner to some of the major themes of Scotist metaphysics. One may only regret that the Scotist’s doctrine of the univocity of being is mentioned all too briefly and that the author does not fully explore the tension it creates with the doctrine of God’s transcendence. In “Universal and Individuation” Timothy Noone offers a remarkably clear analysis of this intricate topic and p…Read more
  •  146
    Difference and Dissent: Theories of Tolerance in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 52 (2): 471-472. 1998.
    Western liberal democracies praise themselves for protecting a full range of differences among individuals and groups. The origin of this ongoing process is thought to be Locke’s Epistola de Tolerantia. Before the Reformation, it is assumed, “a multiplicity of beliefs was deemed to be dangerous, as well as evil; diversity was, so to speak, the devil’s work, and where it existed it was to be stamped out”. Yet, although flattering to liberalism, the conceit of a modern liberal discovery of liberty…Read more
  •  38
    In Contingency, Time and Possibility, Pascal Massie explores the inquiries of Aristotle and Duns Scotus into contingency and possibility, as well as the complex and fascinating questions they raise.
  •  54
    The secret and the neuter: On Heidegger and Blanchot
    Research in Phenomenology 37 (1): 32-55. 2007.
    Blanchot's thought has often been understood as a critique and a reversal of Heidegger's. Indeed, many formulas of the former are construed as mere inversions of the latter. Yet, the philosophical problem raised by the encounter between Blanchot and Heidegger cannot be suffciently accounted for in terms of 'inversion' or 'reversal'. Focusing on the question of the secret in its relation to Geheimnis , this essay starts with a discussion of the notion of secrecy in relation to mysticism and argue…Read more
  •  25
    Saving Contingency
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2): 333-350. 2004.
    It is a common view that Ockham’s critique of Scotus’s position on the issue of contingency is “devastating,” for it seems obvious that a possibility that does notactualize is simply no possibility. This rejection however does not commit Ockham to necessitarism, for the consideration of the temporal discontinuity of volitions should suffice to save contingency. But does it? Is it the case that diachronic volitions (which Scotus also acknowledges) are sufficient?This essay argues that (1) the deb…Read more
  •  33
    The Fate of Place, a Philosophical History (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 51 (2): 411-413. 1997.
    The subtitle of Casey’s work, A Philosophical History, does not denote a merely historiographic enterprise. Although the account of the conceptions of place and space follows a chronological format, from ancient mythological cosmogonies to recent work in continental philosophy, Casey questions primordially the silences, neglects, and absences of this history. Such work takes into focus not only what is gained by successive conceptualizations or what is preserved by a tradition but also, and more…Read more
  •  147
    Diodorus Cronus and the Logic of Time
    Review of Metaphysics 70 (2): 279-309. 2016.
    The master argument posits a metaphysical thesis: Diodorus does away with Aristotle’s dunamis understood as a power simultaneously oriented toward being and non-being and proclaims that possibilities that fail to actualize are simply nothing. My contention is that this claim is not a mere application of Diodorus’ contribution to modal logic. Rather, Diodorus creates an ontologico-temporal concept of possibility and impossibility. Diodorus envisions the future as the past that the future will bec…Read more
  •  656
    Touching, thinking, being: The sense of touch in Aristotle's De Anima and its implications
    Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 17 (1): 74-101. 2013.
    Aristotle’s treatment of tactility is at odds with the hierarchical order of psyche’s faculties. Touching is the commonest and lowest power; it is possessed by all sentient beings; thinking is, on the contrary, the highest faculty that distinguishes human beings. Yet, while Aristotle maintains against some of his predecessors that to think is not to sense, he nevertheless posits a causal link between practical intelligence and tactility and even describes noetic activity as a certain kind of tou…Read more
  •  9
    Saving Contingency: On Ockham’s Objection to Duns Scotus
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2): 333-350. 2004.
    It is a common view that Ockham’s critique of Scotus’s position on the issue of contingency is “devastating,” for it seems obvious that a possibility that does notactualize is simply no possibility. This rejection however does not commit Ockham to necessitarism, for the consideration of the temporal discontinuity of volitions should suffice to save contingency. But does it? Is it the case that diachronic volitions are sufficient?This essay argues that the debate between Ockham and Scotus is not …Read more
  •  7
    The Irony of Chance: On Aristotle’s Physics B, 4-6
    International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1): 15-28. 2003.
    The diversity of interpretations of Aristotle’s treatment of chance and luck springs from an apparent contradiction between the claims that “chance events are for the sake of something” and that “chance events are not for the sake of their outcome.” Chance seems to entail the denial of an end. Yet Aristotle systematically refers it to what is for the sake of an end. This paper suggests that, in order to give an account of chance, a reference to “per accidens causes” is not sufficient. Chance occ…Read more
  •  6
    Les Principes des Choses en Ontologie Médiévale (Thomas d'Aquin, Scot, Occam) (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 52 (4): 930-931. 1999.
    Bastit’s inquiry into the works of Aquinas, Scotus, and Ockham is concerned with the ontological status of things. In the Scholastic vocabulary, res applies to any extramental entity, to the essence of quiddity which determines this external entity, or to one of the transcendentals convertible with Being. Things in their manifold constitute a necessary point of reference for any attempt to escape rationalism as well as voluntarism. Yet in order to understand the difficulty of any “return to the …Read more
  •  87
    Ethics of Property, Ethics of Poverty
    Saint Anselm Journal 12 (1): 38-62. 2016.
    It is surprisingly difficult to justify private property. Two questions are at stake: (a) a metaphysical and juridical one concerning the nature of property and (b) an ethical one concerning our attitude toward wealth. This issue reached an unprecedented importance during the 12th and 13th centuries as a new moral ideal emerged. This essays analyses the controversy (with emphasis on Bonaventure’s Defense of the Mendicants) by first locating it in relation to the philosophical and theological aut…Read more
  •  181
    The actual infinite as a day or the games
    Review of Metaphysics 60 (3): 573-596. 2007.
    It is commonly assumed that Aristotle denies any real existence to infinity. Nothing is actually infinite. If, in order to resolve Zeno’s paradoxes, Aristotle must talk of infinity, it is only in the sense of a potentiality that can never be actualized. Aristotle’s solution has been both praised for its subtlety and blamed for entailing a limitation of mathematic. His understanding of the infinite as simply indefinite (the “bad infinite” that fails to reach its accomplishment), his conception of…Read more