•  16
    Selves, Persons, and the Neo-Lucretian Symmetry Problem
    Philosophia 52 (1): 69-86. 2024.
    The heavily discussed (neo-)Lucretian symmetry argument holds that as we are indifferent to nonexistence before birth, we should also be indifferent to nonexistence after death. An important response to this argument insists that prenatal nonexistence differs from posthumous nonexistence because we could not have been born earlier and been the same ‘thick’ psychological self. As a consequence, we can’t properly ask whether it would be better for us to have had radically different lives either. A…Read more
  • Index
    In John Lippitt & Patrick Stokes (eds.), Narrative, Identity and the Kierkegaardian Self, Edinburgh University Press. pp. 229-236. 2015.
  •  1
    Bibliography
    In John Lippitt & Patrick Stokes (eds.), Narrative, Identity and the Kierkegaardian Self, Edinburgh University Press. pp. 217-228. 2015.
  •  4
    Is Narrative Identity Four‐Dimensionalist?
    European Journal of Philosophy 20 (3). 2011.
    The claim that selves are narratively constituted has attained considerable currency in both analytic and continental philosophy. However, a set of increasingly standard objections to narrative identity are also emerging. In this paper, I focus on metaphysically realist versions of narrative identity theory, showing how they both build on and differ from their neo‐Lockean counterparts. But I also argue that narrative realism is implicitly committed to a four‐dimensionalist, temporal‐parts ontolo…Read more
  •  7
    Introduction
    In John Lippitt & Patrick Stokes (eds.), Narrative, Identity and the Kierkegaardian Self, Edinburgh University Press. pp. 1-10. 2015.
  •  5
    4. Narrative Holism and the Moment
    In John Lippitt & Patrick Stokes (eds.), Narrative, Identity and the Kierkegaardian Self, Edinburgh University Press. pp. 63-77. 2015.
  •  48
    Kierkegaardian vision and the concrete other
    Continental Philosophy Review 39 (4): 393-413. 2006.
    The ethics expressed in Kierkegaard’s Works of Love has been subject to persistent criticism for its perceived indifference to concrete persons and failure to attend to the other in their individual specificity. Recent defenses of Works of Love have focused in large part on the role of vision in the text, showing the supposed “blind” empty formalism of the emphasis on the category of “the neighbor” to serve a normative model of seeing the other correctly. However, when this problem is viewed in …Read more
  •  83
    The Normative Turn in Conspiracy Theory Theory?
    Social Epistemology 37 (4): 535-543. 2023.
    The papers contained in this special issue are evidence that the philosophy of conspiracy theory is undergoing a ‘normative turn’, with earlier concerns about the epistemological soundness of conspiracy theories now being supplemented by a shift to concerns about discursive and epistemic justice. This is a welcome development. Nonetheless, these normative concerns need to be seen within the context of an ongoing and largely undeclared disagreement between generalists and particularists over just…Read more
  •  17
    Social media is full of dead people. What should we do with all these digital souls? Can we delete them, or do they have a right to persist? Patrick Stokes claims that we have a moral duty towards the digital dead. Modern technology helps them to persist in various ways, but - with such developments as AI-driven chatbots simulating the dead - it also makes them vulnerable to new forms of exploitation and abuse. This provocative book explores a range of questions about the nature of death, identi…Read more
  •  43
    Social media is full of dead people. Untold millions of dead users haunt the online world where we increasingly live our lives. What do we do with all these digital souls? Can we simply delete them, or do they have a right to persist? Philosophers have been almost entirely silent on the topic, despite their perennial focus on death as a unique dimension of human existence. Until now. Drawing on ongoing philosophical debates, Digital Souls claims that the digital dead are objects that should be …Read more
  •  12
    The Kierkegaardian Mind (Routledge Philosophical Minds) (edited book)
    with Eleanor Helms and Adam Buben
    Routledge Philosophical Minds. 2019.
    Søren Kierkegaard remains one of the most enigmatic, captivating, and elusive thinkers in the history of European thought. The Kierkegaardian Mindprovides a comprehensive survey of his work, not only placing it in its historical context but also exploring its contemporary significance. Comprising thirty-eight chapters by a team of international contributors, this handbook is divided into eight parts covering the following themes: Methodology Ethics Aesthetics Philosophy of Religion and Theology …Read more
  •  16
    Sylvia Walsh Perkins (editor): Truth is subjectivity: kierkegaard and political theology
    International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 89 (1): 99-103. 2021.
  •  27
    7. Kierkegaard’s Critique of the Internet
    In Mélissa Fox-Muraton (ed.), Kierkegaard and Issues in Contemporary Ethics, De Gruyter. pp. 125-146. 2020.
  •  62
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Knud Ejler Løgstrup were WWII contemporaries: Lutheran theologians and religious figures in their respective German and Danish communities; both active in the anti-Nazi resistance. Being involved in the resistance, Bonhoeffer and Løgstrup were required to rethink what it meant to be ethical, in particular in relation to disclosure and the telling of truth, in a situation of war. In this paper, we consider the grounds on which both Løgstrup and Bonhoeffer acted, their beli…Read more
  •  16
    Despite their many similarities, one apparent difference between the ethics of K.E. Løgstrup and Emmanuel Levinas concerns trust: Levinas does not analyse trust as a morally significant phenomenon, whereas Løgstrup makes it a central component of his moral phenomenology. This paper argues that an analysis of Løgstrupian trust nonetheless reveals at least three important commonalities between Levinas and Løgstrup’s moral projects: an understanding of war and ethics as metaphysical opposites; an e…Read more
  •  31
    The Kierkegaardian Mind (edited book)
    with Eleanor Helms and Adam Buben
    Routledge. 2019.
    Søren Kierkegaard remains one of the most enigmatic, captivating, and elusive thinkers in the history of European thought. The Kierkegaardian Mindprovides a comprehensive survey of his work, not only placing it in its historical context but also exploring its contemporary significance. Comprising thirty-eight chapters by a team of international contributors, this handbook is divided into eight parts covering the following themes: Methodology Ethics Aesthetics Philosophy of Religion and Theology …Read more
  •  65
    Phenomenology, Naturalism and Non-reductive Cognitive Science
    Australasian Philosophical Review 2 (2): 119-124. 2018.
    Volume 2, Issue 2, June 2018, Page 119-124.
  •  1
    On Some Moral Costs of Conspiracy Theorizing
    In Matthew R. X. Dentith (ed.), Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously, Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 189-202. 2018.
    Stokes’ earlier chapter in this volume argued that, given the role ethical considerations play in our judgments of what to believe, ethical factors will put limits on the extent to which we can embrace particularism about conspiracy theories. However, that will only be the case if there are ethical problems with conspiracy theory as a practice (rather than simply as a formal class of explanation). Utilising the Lakatosian framework for analysing conspiracy theories developed by Steve Clarke, thi…Read more
  •  3
    Conspiracy Theory and the Perils of Pure Particularism
    In Matthew R. X. Dentith (ed.), Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously, Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 25-37. 2018.
    The epistemological literature on conspiracy theory has established that strict generalism about conspiracy theories is untenable. This chapter argues, however, that this does not license a move to naive or strict particularism. Rather, any consideration of specific conspiracy claims needs to address conspiracy theory not simply as a formal category of explanation, but as a distinctive social practice, with a history and explanatory repertoire that can give us important, if defeasible, reasons f…Read more
  •  9
    A Moral Education
    Philosophy Now 130 38-39. 2019.
  •  51
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Knud Ejler Løgstrup were WWII contemporaries: Lutheran theologians and religious figures in their respective German and Danish communities; both active in the anti-Nazi resistance. Being involved in the resistance, Bonhoeffer and Løgstrup were required to rethink what it meant to be ethical, in particular in relation to disclosure and the telling of truth, in a situation of war. In this paper, we consider the grounds on which both Løgstrup and Bonhoeffer acted, their beli…Read more
  •  55
    Existentialist Methodology and Perspective: Writing the First-person
    In Soren Overgaard & Giuseppina D'Oro (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Philosophical Methodology, Cambridge University Press. pp. 344-65. 2017.
    Without proposing anything quite so grandiose as a return to existentialism, in this paper we aim to articulate and minimally defend certain core existentialist insights concerning the first-person perspective, the relationship between theory and practice, and the mode of philosophical presentation conducive to best making those points. We will do this by considering some of the central methodological objections that have been posed around the role of the first-person perspective and “lived expe…Read more
  •  88
    Are there dead persons?
    Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (6): 755-775. 2019.
    Schechtman’s ‘Person Life View’ offers an account of personal identity whereby persons are the unified loci of our practical and ethical judgment. PLV also recognises infants and permanent vegetative state patients as being persons. I argue that the way PLV handles these cases yields an unexpected result: the dead also remain persons, contrary to the widely-accepted ‘Termination Thesis.’ Even more surprisingly, this actually counts in PLV’s favor: in light of our social and ethical practices whi…Read more
  •  17
    Is Narrative Identity Four‐Dimensionalist?
    European Journal of Philosophy 20 (S1): 86-106. 2012.
    The claim that selves are narratively constituted has attained considerable currency in both analytic and continental philosophy. However, a set of increasingly standard objections to narrative identity are also emerging. In this paper, I focus on metaphysically realist versions of narrative identity theory, showing how they both build on and differ from their neo‐Lockean counterparts. But I also argue that narrative realism is implicitly committed to a four‐dimensionalist, temporal‐parts ontolo…Read more
  •  7
    Suspicious minds
    The Philosophers' Magazine 65 62-67. 2014.
  •  20
    The Naked Self: Kierkegaard and Personal Identity
    Oxford University Press UK. 2015.
    The Naked Self explores Søren Kierkegaard's understanding of selfhood by situating his work in relation to central problems in contemporary philosophy of personal identity: the role of memory in selfhood, the relationship between the notional and actual subjects of memory and anticipation, the phenomenology of diachronic self-experience, affective alienation from our past and future, psychological continuity, practical and narrative approaches to identity, and the intelligibility of posthumous s…Read more
  •  25
    Stokes, Patrick The announcement that Woolworths will phase out the selling of cage eggs seems like pretty good news