•  13
    Responsibility - Beyond Resentment and Indignation
    Philosophia 47 (4): 995-1009. 2019.
    My aim in this article is to flesh out a new distinction between moral responsibility, as it is understood in light of Strawson’s “reactive attitudes,” and an institutional form of responsibility—a responsibility that employees bear for their work to their superiors. I show that Strawson’s view of responsibility is separate from organizational responsibility, and hence the responsibility of employees to their managers cannot be understood in terms of indignation or resentment, both of which are …Read more
  •  10
    Two Forms of Responsibility – Organizational and Societal
    Philosophy of Management 17 (2): 187-201. 2018.
  • Identification of common variants influencing risk of the tauopathy progressive supranuclear palsy
    with G. U. Höglinger, N. M. Melhem, D. W. Dickson, P. M. A. Sleiman, L. S. Wang, L. Klei, R. Rademakers, R. De Silva, I. Litvan, J. C. de RileyVan Swieten, P. Heutink, Z. K. Wszolek, R. J. Uitti, J. Vandrovcova, H. I. Hurtig, R. G. Gross, W. Maetzler, S. Goldwurm, E. Tolosa, B. Borroni, P. Pastor, L. B. Cantwell, M. R. Han, A. Dillman, M. P. Van Der Brug, Gibbs Jr, M. R. Cookson, D. G. Hernandez, A. B. Singleton, M. J. Farrer, C. E. Yu, L. I. Golbe, T. Revesz, J. Hardy, A. J. Lees, B. Devlin, H. Hakonarson, U. Müller, G. D. Schellenberg, E. Alonso, A. Antonini, M. Apfelbacher, S. E. Arnold, J. Avila, T. G. Beach, S. Beecher, D. Berg, T. D. Bird, N. Bogdanovic, A. J. W. Boon, Y. Bordelon, A. Brice, H. Budka, M. Canesi, W. Z. Chiu, R. Cilia, C. Colosimo, P. P. De Deyn, J. G. De Yebenes, L. D. Kaat, R. Duara, A. Durr, S. Engelborghs, G. Fabbrini, N. A. Finch, R. Flook, M. P. Frosch, C. Gaig, D. R. Galasko, T. Gasser, M. Gearing, E. T. Geller, B. Ghetti, N. R. Graff-Radford, M. Grossman, L. N. da HallHazrati, M. Höllerhage, J. Jankovic, J. L. Juncos, and Karydas
    Progressive supranuclear palsy is a movement disorder with prominent tau neuropathology. Brain diseases with abnormal tau deposits are called tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer's disease. Environmental causes of tauopathies include repetitive head trauma associated with some sports. To identify common genetic variation contributing to risk for tauopathies, we carried out a genome-wide association study of 1,114 individuals with PSP and 3,247 controls followed by a second stage in…Read more
  • Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis
    with D. C. Whitcomb, J. LaRusch, A. M. Krasinskas, L. Klei, J. P. Smith, R. E. Brand, J. P. Neoptolemos, M. M. Lerch, M. Tector, B. S. Sandhu, N. M. Guda, L. Orlichenko, S. Alkaade, S. T. Amann, M. A. Anderson, J. Baillie, P. A. Banks, D. Conwell, G. A. Coté, P. B. Cotton, J. DiSario, C. E. la FarrerForsmark, M. Johnstone, T. B. Gardner, A. Gelrud, W. Greenhalf, J. L. Haines, D. J. Hartman, R. A. Hawes, C. Lawrence, M. Lewis, J. Mayerle, R. Mayeux, N. M. Melhem, M. E. Money, T. Muniraj, G. I. Papachristou, M. A. Pericak-Vance, J. Romagnuolo, G. D. Schellenberg, S. Sherman, P. Simon, V. P. Singh, A. Slivka, D. Stolz, R. Sutton, F. U. Weiss, C. M. Wilcox, N. O. Zarnescu, S. R. Wisniewski, M. R. O'Connell, M. L. Kienholz, K. Roeder, M. M. Barmada, D. Yadav, B. Devlin, Albert M. S., L. G. Apostolova, S. E. Arnold, C. T. Baldwin, R. Barber, L. L. Barnes, T. G. Beach, G. W. Beecham, D. Beekly, E. H. da BennettBigio, T. D. Bird, D. Blacker, A. Boxer, Burke Jr, J. D. Buxbaum, N. J. Cairns, L. B. Cantwell, C. Cao, R. M. Carney, S. L. Carroll, H. C. Chui, and D. Clark
    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two associations at genome-wide significance identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 and X-linked CLDN2 through a two-stage genome-wide study. The PRSS1 variant likely affects disease susceptibility …Read more
  •  21
    Sham surgery controls are mitigated trolleys
    Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (3): 149-152. 2005.
    Debate continues about the ethics of sham surgery controls. The most powerful argument for sham surgery controls is that rigorous experiments are needed to demonstrate safety and efficacy of surgical procedures. Without such experiments, there is danger of adopting worthless procedures in clinical practice. Opponents of sham surgery controls argue that sham surgery constitutes unacceptable violation of the rights of research subjects. Recent philosophical discussion has used two thought experime…Read more
  •  40
    Sham surgery is a controversial and rarely used component of randomised clinical trials evaluating surgical interventions. The recent use of sham surgery in trials evaluating efficacy of intracerebral fetal tissue grafts in Parkinson’s disease has highlighted the ethical concerns associated with sham surgery controls. Macklin, and Dekkers and Boer argue vigorously against use of sham surgery controls. Macklin presents a broad argument against sham surgery controls while Dekkers and Boer present …Read more
  •  154
    Two Forms of Responsibility – Organizational and Societal
    Philosophy of Management 1-15. 2017.
    My aim in this article is twofold. First, I will illuminate the triangular conceptual connections between responsibility, authority, and power as they are exposed in the organizational realm; second, I will show how the three concepts are distinct. Relying on the work of Peter Strawson and his followers on responsibility for my point of departure, I will show that the connection between the inner corporational authority and its inner matching responsibility is different from the connection betwe…Read more
  •  260
    BEYOND MODES OF OBJECTIVITY
    Logos and Episteme (3): 361-371. 2012.
    ABSTRACT: Frege, and others who followed him, stressed the role of fallibility as a means to defining ‘objectivity.’ By defining objective judgments as fallible, these philosophers contributed to the consolidation of a theory of objectivity which suggested interpreting epistemological, as well as other judgements, as being objective. An important philosophical implication of this theory lies in its disclosure of the interrelations between truth and objectivity. In light of this insight, and base…Read more
  •  4
    Journalists as Agents of Cultural Change: From Rationality Back to Nature
    International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (2): 265-274. 2007.
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways in which journalism—print and electronic—shapes our cultural fabric and modes of discourse. Journalists report facts and comment on them in a provocative style. They stimulate us with captivating images and colorful language, shifting our minds from a more intellectual contemplation of reality. Finally, journalists bring death into our lives through grim pictures of wars and natural disasters. I suggest that these relatively recent trends in journ…Read more
  •  22
    Collective Responsibility: Organizations as Organic Entities
    Open Journal of Philosophy 6 (4): 392-405. 2016.
    The question of who exactly is responsible for an organization’s actions cannot be too carefully considered, as a clear understanding of this point is crucial from ethical, moral, managerial, and public perspectives. This article discusses how to justify a non-participant member’s responsibility for the actions of other group members, establishing collective responsibility. The article develops a novel context-depended framework that solves this problem by supplying good grounds for perceiving o…Read more
  •  52
    Modern technology as a denaturalizing force
    Poiesis and Praxis 4 (4): 289-302. 2006.
    Modern technological discourse and practices are the outcome of numerous changes in our cultural makeup. The most intriguing question regards the kind of human sensibilities and character traits manifested by technological practices. What, in other words, is the phenomenology of a given practice? In this paper, I argue that technological interventions not only usurp the natural for the sake of the cultural, thereby leaving no room for an independent natural realm; by conquering and taking contro…Read more
  •  1
    A Chronicle of the Decline of Rationality: Ethics in the Practice of Journalism
    HaKibutz HaMeuchad & Sapir College Publishing. 2004.
    The book examines the ethical aspect of journalistic activity in an attempt to understand and render explicit the values which guide journalists in their work, but it emphasizes the point that while such values reflect society's existing professional mores, this particular profession is also placed in such a way as to shape the consciousness and values of those who consume its working product. The central question of this work has to do with the ethical implications of journalistic activity, and…Read more
  •  102
    Journalists as agents of cultural change: From rationality back to nature
    International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (2): 265-274. 2007.
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways in which journalism—print and electronic—shapes our cultural fabric and modes of discourse. Journalists report facts and comment on them in a provocative style. They stimulate us with captivating images and colorful language, shifting our minds from a more intellectual contemplation of reality. Finally, journalists bring death into our lives through grim pictures of wars and natural disasters. I suggest that these relatively recent trends in journ…Read more