•  17
    Where Socratic Akrasia Meets the Platonic Good
    Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1): 1-21. 2021.
    ARRAY
  •  52
    Bias and interpersonal skepticism
    Noûs. forthcoming.
  • The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy 2 Volume Set (edited book)
    Cambridge University Press. 2014.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with d…Read more
  •  7
    Aquinas
    Mind 114 (453): 203-206. 2005.
  •  1
    On EvilOn Evil (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 57 (3): 599-600. 2004.
    After an initial, highly difficult question on the metaphysics of the bad, Aquinas turns his attention to bad action, and then very quickly turns to focus on the sort of bad actions most relevant to theology: voluntary bad action. At this point we are squarely in the moral domain, and so we might as well speak of bad actions as sins. In question 2, Aquinas takes up questions regarding the character of sin, assessing the way in which intentions, actions, objects, and circumstances contribute to t…Read more
  • Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy Volume 6 (edited book)
    Oxford University Press. 2018.
    Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy showcases the best new scholarly work on philosophy from the end of antiquity into the Renaissance. OSMP combines historical scholarship with philosophical acuteness, and will be an essential resource for anyone working in the area.
  •  36
    Belief in a Fallen World
    Res Philosophica 95 (3): 531-559. 2018.
    In an ideal epistemic world, our beliefs would correspond to our evidence, and our evidence would be bountiful. In the world we live in, however, if we wish to live meaningful lives, other epistemic strategies are necessary. Here I attempt to work out, systematically, the ways in which evidentialism fails us as a guide to belief. This is so preeminently for lives of a religious character, but the point applies more broadly.
  •  9
    Aquinas on Mind
    Philosophical Review 103 (4): 745. 1994.
  • The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy: Volume 2
    Cambridge University Press. 2010.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters take the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with di…Read more
  • The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy: Volume 1
    Cambridge University Press. 2010.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters take the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with di…Read more
  •  1
    After Certainty offers a reconstruction of the history of epistemology, understood as a series of changing expectations about the cognitive ideal that we might hope to achieve in this world. Pasnau ranges widely over philosophy from Aristotle to the 17th century, and examines in some detail the rise of science as an autonomous discipline.
  •  20
    Plotting Augustine's Confessions
    Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 3 (2): 77-106. 2000.
    Some ideas on how to teach the Confessions in an introductory philosophy class.
  • Scholastic philosophers in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries advanced original and sophisticated accounts of the nature of cognition and mental representation. This dissertation analyzes some of the debates of that period, beginning with Thomas Aquinas and going on to consider a number of his most penetrating critics: Henry of Ghent , Peter John Olivi , William Ockham , and William Crathorn . The study begins with some of the theoretical foundations of scholastic theories of cognition, suc…Read more
  • Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy Volume 5 (edited book)
    Oxford University Press. 2017.
    Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy showcases the best new scholarly work on philosophy from the end of antiquity into the Renaissance. OSMP combines historical scholarship with philosophical acuteness, and will be an essential resource for anyone working in the area.
  •  72
    What Is Cognition? A Reply to Some Critics
    American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (3): 483-490. 2002.
    In an earlier work, I proposed understanding Aquinas’s theory of cognition in terms of the possession of information about the world. This proposal has seemed problematic in various ways. It has been said to include too much, and too little, and to be the wrong sort of account altogether. Nevertheless, I continue to think of it as the most plausible interpretation of Aquinas’s theory
  •  24
    Aquinas: Moral, Political, and Legal Theory (review)
    Faith and Philosophy 17 (3): 407-413. 2000.
  •  117
    Medieval epistemology begins as ideal theory: when is one ideally situated with regard to one's grasp of the way things are? Taking as their starting point Aristotle's Posterior Analytics, scholastic authors conceive of the goal of cognitive inquiry as the achievement of scientia, a systematic body of beliefs, grasped as certain, and grounded in demonstrative reasons that show the reason why things are so. Obviously, however, there is not much we know in this way. The very strictness of this ide…Read more
  •  99
    The event of color
    Philosophical Studies 142 (3). 2009.
    When objects are illuminated, the light they reflect does not simply bounce off their surface. Rather, that light is entirely reabsorbed and then reemitted, as the result of a complex microphysical event near the surface of the object. If we are to be physicalists regarding color, then we should analyze colors in terms of that event, just as we analyze heat in terms of molecular motion, and sound in terms of vibrations. On this account, colors are not standing properties of objects, but events, …Read more
  •  8
    Id Quo Cognoscimus
    In Petra Simo Kärkkäinen Knuuttila (ed.), Theories of Perception in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy, . pp. 131--149. 2008.
  •  31
    Snatching Hope from the Jaws of Epistemic Defeat
    Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (2): 257--275. 2015.
    Reflection on the history of skepticism shows that philosophers have often conjoined as a single doctrine various theses that are best kept apart. Some of these theses are incredible – literally almost impossible to accept – whereas others seem quite plausible, and even verging on the platitudinous. Mixing them together, one arrives at a view – skepticism – that is as a whole indefensible. My aim is to pull these different elements apart, and to focus on one particular strand of skepticism that …Read more
  •  121
    Philosophy of mind and human nature
    In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas, Oxford University Press. 2011.
    A theory of human nature must consider from the start whether it sees human beings in fundamentally biological terms, as animals like other animals, or else in fundamentally supernatural terms, as creatures of God who are like God in some special way, and so importantly unlike other animals. Many of the perennial philosophical disputes have proved so intractable in part because their adherents divide along these lines. The friends of materialism, seeing human beings as just a particularly comple…Read more
  •  47
    Divine illumination
    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2008.
  •  6
    Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Volume 1 (edited book)
    Oxford University Press. 2013.
    Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy showcases the best new scholarly work on philosophy from the end of antiquity into the Renaissance. OSMP combines historical scholarship with philosophical acuteness, and will be an essential resource for anyone working in the area
  •  138
    On existing all at once
    In C. Tapp (ed.), God, Eternity, and Time, Ashgate. 2011.
    It is important to distinguish between two ways in which God might be timelessly eternal: eternality as being wholly outside of time, versus the sort of timelessness that consists in lacking temporal parts, and so existing “all at once.” A prominent but neglected historical tradition, most clearly evident in Anselm, advocates putting God in time, but in an all-at-once sort of way that makes God immune to temporal change. This is an intrinsically plausible conception of divine eternality, which a…Read more
  •  27
    Therapeutic Reflections on Our Bipolar History of Perception
    Analytic Philosophy 57 (4): 253-284. 2016.
    The long history of theorizing about perception divides into two quite distinct and irreconcilable camps, one that takes sensory experience to show us external reality just as it is, and one that takes such experience to reveal our own mind. I argue that we should reject both sides of this debate, and admit that the phenomenal character of experience, as such, reveals little about the nature of the external world and even less about the mind.