•  2
    Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments
    with Giovanni Sartor and Adam Wyner
    Artificial Intelligence and Law 28 (1): 69-89. 2020.
    Disputes over causes play a central role in legal argumentation and liability attribution. Legal approaches to causation often struggle to capture cause-in-fact in complex situations, e.g. overdetermination, preemption, omission. In this paper, we first assess three current theories of causation to illustrate their strengths and weaknesses in capturing cause-in-fact. Secondly, we introduce a semi-formal framework for modelling causal arguments through strict and defeasible rules. Thirdly, the fr…Read more
  •  2
    Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments
    with Giovanni Sartor and Adam Wyner
    Artificial Intelligence and Law 28 (1): 69-89. 2020.
    Disputes over causes play a central role in legal argumentation and liability attribution. Legal approaches to causation often struggle to capture cause-in-fact in complex situations, e.g. overdetermination, preemption, omission. In this paper, we first assess three current theories of causation to illustrate their strengths and weaknesses in capturing cause-in-fact. Secondly, we introduce a semi-formal framework for modelling causal arguments through strict and defeasible rules. Thirdly, the fr…Read more
  •  11
    Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments
    with Giovanni Sartor and Adam Wyner
    Artificial Intelligence and Law 28 (1): 69-89. 2020.
    Disputes over causes play a central role in legal argumentation and liability attribution. Legal approaches to causation often struggle to capture cause-in-fact in complex situations, e.g. overdetermination, preemption, omission. In this paper, we first assess three current theories of causation to illustrate their strengths and weaknesses in capturing cause-in-fact. Secondly, we introduce a semi-formal framework for modelling causal arguments through strict and defeasible rules. Thirdly, the fr…Read more
  •  17
    Research in progress: report on the ICAIL 2017 doctoral consortium
    with Maria Dymitruk, Réka Markovich, Mirna El Ghosh, Robert van Doesburg, Guido Governatori, and Bart Verheij
    Artificial Intelligence and Law 26 (1): 49-97. 2018.
    This paper arose out of the 2017 international conference on AI and law doctoral consortium. There were five students who presented their Ph.D. work, and each of them has contributed a section to this paper. The paper offers a view of what topics are currently engaging students, and shows the diversity of their interests and influences.