•  120
    Intellectual virtues: an essay in regulative epistemology
    with Robert C. Roberts
    Oxford University Press. 2007.
    From the ferment of recent debates about the intellectual virtues, Roberts and Wood develop an approach they call 'regulative epistemology', exploring the connection between knowledge and intellectual virtue. In the course of their argument they analyse particular virtues of intellectual life - such as courage, generosity, and humility - in detail
  •  63
    Faith with reason
    Philosophical Review 110 (4): 629-631. 2001.
    Paul Helm’s Faith With Reason articulates and defends an account of reasonable religious faith that claims that religious faith consists of both cognitive and fiduciary elements. One part of religious faith consists of propositions about the object of religious devotion whose strength “ought to conform to the evidence for the proposition in question, ” if they are to held reasonably. Religious belief is not a special species of belief, says Helm, but is subject to the same standards of evidence …Read more
  •  5
    Book reviews (review)
    with James Franklin, Colin M. Patrick, Frances Gray, Patrick Hutchings, Horace Jeffery Hodges, and John Bryant
    Sophia 42 (2): 135-148. 2003.
  •  76
    Intellectual Virtues: An Essay in Regulative Epistemology
    with Robert C. Roberts
    Oxford University Press UK. 2007.
    Out of the ferment of recent debates about the intellectual virtues, Roberts and Wood have developed an approach they call 'regulative epistemology'. This is partly a return to classical and medieval traditions, partly in the spirit of Locke's and Descartes's concern for intellectual formation, partly an exploration of connections between epistemology and ethics, and partly an approach that has never been tried before. Standing on the shoulders of recent epistemologists - including William Alsto…Read more
  •  1
    The Justification of Doctrinal Beliefs
    Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. 1986.
    This dissertation examines the strategy of justifying doctrinal beliefs by appealing to special revelation. Even if one thinks that belief in God is rationally warranted, it does not follow that one's distinctive religious doctrines are justified. Though theism may be justified, it remains an open question whether or not believers are entitled to believe, for example, that Jesus Christ is God Incarnate or that God is triune. Traditionally, religious believers have claimed that their doctrinal be…Read more
  •  55
    Christian Theism and the Problems of Philosophy (review)
    Teaching Philosophy 15 (3): 277-280. 1992.
  •  35
    Vainglory: The Forgotten Vice, by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung (review)
    Faith and Philosophy 34 (1): 107-110. 2017.
  •  23
    Moral Wisdom and Good Lives (review)
    Faith and Philosophy 16 (1): 122-126. 1999.
  •  26
    Faith With Reason (review)
    Philosophical Review 110 (4): 629-631. 2001.
    Paul Helm’s Faith With Reason articulates and defends an account of reasonable religious faith that claims that religious faith consists of both cognitive and fiduciary elements. One part of religious faith consists of propositions about the object of religious devotion whose strength “ought to conform to the evidence for the proposition in question, ” if they are to held reasonably. Religious belief is not a special species of belief, says Helm, but is subject to the same standards of evidence …Read more
  •  35
    Faith with Reason
    Philosophical Review 110 (4): 629. 2001.
    Paul Helm’s Faith With Reason articulates and defends an account of reasonable religious faith that claims that religious faith consists of both cognitive and fiduciary elements. One part of religious faith consists of propositions about the object of religious devotion whose strength “ought to conform to the evidence for the proposition in question, ” if they are to held reasonably. Religious belief is not a special species of belief, says Helm, but is subject to the same standards of evidence …Read more
  •  6
    Book reviews (review)
    with George W. Shields
    International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 36 (3): 187-192. 1994.
  •  68
    Humility and epistemic goods
    with Robert C. Roberts
    In Michael Raymond DePaul & Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski (eds.), Intellectual virtue: perspectives from ethics and epistemology, Oxford University Press. pp. 257--279. 2003.
    Some of the most interesting works in virtue ethics are the detailed, perceptive treatments of specific virtues and vices. This chapter aims to develop such work as it relates to intellectual virtues and vices. It begins by examining the virtue of intellectual humility. Its strategy is to situate humility in relation to its various opposing vices, which include vices like arrogance, vanity, conceit, egotism, grandiosity, pretentiousness, snobbishness, haughtiness, and self-complacency. From this…Read more
  •  13
    Reason's Rapport
    Faith and Philosophy 21 (4): 519-532. 2004.
  •  121
    Axiology, self-deception, and moral wrongdoing in Blaise Pascal's pensées
    Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2): 355-384. 2009.
    Blaise Pascal is highly regarded as a religious moralist, but he has rarely been given his due as an ethical theorist. The goal of this article is to assemble Pascal's scattered thoughts on moral judgment and moral wrongdoing into an explicit, coherent account that can serve as the basis for further scholarly reflection on his ethics. On my reading, Pascal affirms an axiological, social-intuitionist account of moral judgment and moral wrongdoing. He argues that a moral judgment is an immediate, …Read more
  •  25
    Reason's Rapport
    Faith and Philosophy 21 (4): 519-532. 2004.