•  31
    Failure criterion for metallic glasses
    with M. Q. Jiang, Y. J. Wei, and L. H. Dai
    Philosophical Magazine 91 (36): 4536-4554. 2011.
  •  4
    There is currently an evidentiary gap in the scholarship concerning medical tourism's impact on low- and middle-income destination countries. This article reviews relevant evidence that exists and concludes that there are signs of correlation between medical tourism and the expansion of private, technology- intensive health care in LMICs, which has largely remained out of reach for the majority of the local patients. In light of this health care inequity between local residents and medical touri…Read more
  •  21
    Medical Tourism's Impact on Health Care Equity and Access in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Making the Case for Regulation
    with Colleen M. Flood
    Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1): 286-300. 2013.
    Travelling internationally to acquire medical treatments otherwise unavailable or inaccessible in one’s home country is not a novel concept. Conventionally, such medical travel largely entailed patients from developed countries or wealthy patients from the developing world seeking care in Western facilities like the Mayo Clinic in the U.S. and myriad private clinics along Harley Street in London, England. What is different about the topical phenomenon known as “medical tourism” is the growing tr…Read more
  •  41
    Medical Tourism's Impact on Health Care Equity and Access in Low‐ and Middle‐Income Countries: Making the Case for Regulation
    with Colleen M. Flood
    Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1): 286-300. 2013.
    There is currently an evidentiary gap in the scholarship concerning medical tourism's impact on low- and middle-income destination countries (LMICs). This article reviews relevant evidence that exists and concludes that there are signs of correlation between medical tourism and the expansion of private, technology- intensive health care in LMICs, which has largely remained out of reach for the majority of the local patients. In light of this health care inequity between local residents and medic…Read more
  •  41
    "Allow natural death" is not equivalent to "do not resuscitate": a response
    Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12): 887-888. 2008.
    Venneman and colleagues argue that “do not resuscitate” (DNR) is problematic and should be replaced by “allow natural death” (AND). Their argument is flawed. First, while end-of-life discussions should be as positive as possible, they cannot and should not sidestep painful but necessary confrontations with morality. Second, while DNR can indeed be nonspecific and confusing, AND merely replaces one problematic term with another. Finally, the study’s results are not generalisable to the population…Read more
  •  34
    Background: Although ethics consultation has been introduced to clinical practice for many years, the results of empirical studies to evaluate the effectiveness of ethics consultation are still controversial. The design of randomised controlled trials is considered the best research design to evaluate the effect of a clinical practice on the outcomes of interests. In order to understand the effects of ethics consultation, we conducted this search for studies with the design of randomised control…Read more