•  4
    Time, History, and Buddhism
    Journal of Japanese Philosophy 6 95-110. 2020.
    In the field of comparative religion, many scholars believe that there are essentially two groups: the historical religions, such as Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; and the mystical religions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Daoism. These, respectively, represent the basic spiritual attitude of the Western and Eastern worlds. Is it really the case that the Eastern world knows nothing about history, or is their idea of history different from that of the West? In this article, I will focus on a …Read more
  •  7
    The tensile properties of irradiated Ni single crystals and their temperature dependence
    with R. Schäublin, P. Spätig, and Victoria M.
    Philosophical Magazine 85 (4-7): 745-755. 2005.
  •  7
    Irradiation-induced stacking fault tetrahedra in fcc metals
    with R. Schäublin *, N. Baluc, and Victoria M.
    Philosophical Magazine 85 (4-7): 769-777. 2005.
  • Brahman and Dao: Comparative Studies of Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion (edited book)
    with Ithamar Theodor
    Lexington Books. 2013.
    Although there are various studies comparing Greek and Indian philosophy and religion, and Chinese and Western philosophy and religion, Brahman and Dao: Comparatives Studies in Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion is a first of its kind that brings together Indian and Chinese philosophies and religions. Brahman and Dao helps close the gap on a much needed examination on the rich history of Buddhist transmission to China, and the many generations of Indian Buddhist missionaries to China and…Read more
  •  57
    The Silence of the Buddha
    Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6 289-298. 2008.
    The current paper reflects my own personal struggle between two different fields of my training and career: religious studies and philosophy. Scholars with training in religious studies are understandably less interested in philosophical issues and more interested in such issues as myth, ritual, practice, eschatology, and, in the case of Buddhism and other Indian religions, soteriology. I will mainly address the tension between soteriological and philosophical discourses. I do agree that philoso…Read more
  • Brahman and Dao: Comparative Studies of Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion (edited book)
    with Ithamar Theodor and Zhihua Yao
    Lexington Books. 2013.
    Although there are various studies comparing Greek and Indian philosophy and religion, and Chinese and Western philosophy and religion, Brahman and Dao: Comparatives Studies in Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion is a first of its kind that brings together Indian and Chinese philosophies and religions. Brahman and Dao helps close the gap on a much needed examination on the rich history of Buddhist transmission to China, and the many generations of Indian Buddhist missionaries to China and…Read more
  •  87
    The Buddhist Theory of Self-Cognition
    Routledge. 2005, 2009.
    This highly original work explores the concept of self-awareness or self-consciousness in Buddhist thought. Its central thesis is that the Buddhist theory of self-cognition originated in a soteriological discussion of omniscience among the Mahasamghikas, and then evolved into a topic of epistemological inquiry among the Yogacarins. To illustrate this central theme, this book explores a large body of primary sources in Chinese, Pali, Sanskrit and Tibetan, most of which are presented to an English…Read more
  •  30
    Heavy-ion irradiations of Fe and Fe–Cr model alloys Part 1: Damage evolution in thin-foils at lower doses
    with M. Hernández-Mayoral, M. L. Jenkins, and M. A. Kirk
    Philosophical Magazine 88 (21): 2851-2880. 2008.
  •  16
    Heavy-ion irradiations of Fe and Fe–Cr model alloys Part 2: Damage evolution in thin-foils at higher doses
    with M. Hernández-Mayoral, M. L. Jenkins, and M. A. Kirk
    Philosophical Magazine 88 (21): 2881-2897. 2008.
  •  439
    Non-Cognition and the Third Pramāṇa
    In Helmut Krasser, Horst Lasic, Eli Franco & Birgit Kellner (eds.), Religion and Logic in Buddhist Philosophical Analysis, Verlag Der Österreichischen Akademie Der Wissenschaften. 2011.
    The present paper discusses some concepts and materials that may be linked to Īśvarasena’s theory of non-cognition. These include the concept of feiliang 非量 as found in the writings of Dharmapāla, Asvabhāva, Jinaputra and their Chinese counterparts, and apramāṇatā (or apramāṇatva), as found in the works of Dharmakīrti and his commentators. I shall demonstrate that the two concepts in many ways mirror the theory of three pramāṇas, proposed by Īśvarasena. As most of these materials are from the si…Read more
  •  91
    Dignāaga and four types of perception
    Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (1): 57-79. 2004.
  •  6524
    Typology of Nothing: Heidegger, Daoism and Buddhism
    Comparative Philosophy 1 (1): 78-89. 2010.
    Parmenides expelled nonbeing from the realm of knowledge and forbade us to think or talk about it. But still there has been a long tradition of nay-sayings throughout the history of Western and Eastern philosophy. Are those philosophers talking about the same nonbeing or nothing? If not, how do their concepts of nothing differ from each other? Could there be different types of nothing? Surveying the traditional classifications of nothing or nonbeing in the East and West have led me to develop a …Read more
  •  82
    “I Have Lost Me”: Zhuangzi’s Butterfly Dream
    Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4): 511-526. 2013.
    The parable of the butterfly dream is one of the most interesting and influential passages among Zhuangzi's beautiful writings. This article interprets the butterfly dream from an interdisciplinary approach. The review of mythological and religious sources reveals that the image of the butterfly is widely understood to symbolize the human self or soul. The scientific study of dream experience touches upon the issue of self-consciousness and the sense of two-tiered self. The philosophical and psy…Read more
  •  6
    Microstructure evolution during electron and ion irradiation in commercial purity magnesium
    with A. K. Khan and M. R. Daymond
    Philosophical Magazine 94 (17): 1909-1923. 2014.
  •  884
    “Suddenly Deluded Thoughts Arise”: Karmic Appearance in Huayan Buddhism
    Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2): 198-214. 2010.
    This study deals with the tensions between old and new Yogācāra, as seen in the Huayan sources, which, in turn, reflect discontinuity between Indian Yogācāra and its reception in China. Its particular focus is on the concept of karmic appearance , as developed in the Awakening of Faith and further elaborated on by many Huayanmasters. This concept illustrates the sudden arising of deluded thoughts and provides us with a paradigm for the approach to the problem of delusion, a problem that is deepl…Read more
  •  7
    The tensile properties of irradiated Ni single crystals and their temperature dependence
    with R. Schäublin, P. Spätig, and M. Victoria
    Philosophical Magazine 85 (4-7): 745-755. 2005.
  •  166
    Empty subject terms in buddhist logic: Dignāga and his chinese commentators
    Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (4): 383-398. 2009.
    The problem of empty terms is one of the focal issues in analytic philosophy. Russell’s theory of descriptions, a proposal attempting to solve this problem, attracted much attention and is considered a hallmark of the analytic tradition. Scholars of Indian and Buddhist philosophy, e.g., McDermott, Matilal, Shaw and Perszyk, have studied discussions of empty terms in Indian and Buddhist philosophy. But most of these studies rely heavily on the Nyāya or Navya-Nyāya sources, in which Buddhists are …Read more
  •  9
    Effect of simultaneous helium implantation on the microstructure evolution of Inconel X-750 superalloy during dual-beam irradiation
    with P. Changizian and H. K. Zhang
    Philosophical Magazine 95 (35): 3933-3949. 2015.
  •  1
    The dissertation explores the historical development of the Yogacara doctrine of self-cognition. The concept "self-cognition " refers to the reflexive nature of the human mind, which is also a main subject in modern psychology and the rapidly-growing field of cognitive science. My central thesis is that the Buddhist doctrine of self-cognition originated in a soteriological discussion of omniscience among the Mahasam&dotbelow;ghikas, an early Buddhist school established right after the first schi…Read more
  •  14
    Irradiation-induced stacking fault tetrahedra in fcc metals
    with R. Schäublin, N. Baluc, and M. Victoria
    Philosophical Magazine 85 (4-7): 769-777. 2005.
  •  454
    Some Mahāsāṃghika Arguments for the Cognition of Nonexistent Objects
    Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research 25 (3): 79-96. 2008.
    The present paper explores some pre-Vibhāṣika sources including the Kathāvatthu, *Śāriputrābhidharma, and Vijñānakāya. These sources suggest an early origin of the concept of the cognition of nonexistent objects (asad-ālambana-jñāna) among the Mahāsāṃghikas and some of its sub-schools. These scattered sources also indicate some different aspects of this theory from that held by the Dārṣṭāntikas and the Sautrāntikas. In particular, some Mahāsāṃghika arguments for the cognition of nonexistent obje…Read more
  •  133
    Four-dimensional time in dzogchen and Heidegger
    Philosophy East and West 57 (4): 512-532. 2007.
    : Concerning time, we have many puzzles, such as what eternity is, how it is related to the passage of time, whether the passage of time is irreversible, whether things past are no longer, whether the future is non-predictable, whether or not the present exists, and so on. This article is an attempt to discuss such experiences of the passage of time. First, a Buddhist practice in the Dzogchen tradition that deals with the experience of the passage of time will be introduced, then Longchenpa’s co…Read more
  •  7
    Brittle–ductile transitions in polycrystalline tungsten
    with A. Giannattasio, E. Tarleton, and S. G. Roberts
    Philosophical Magazine 90 (30): 3947-3959. 2010.
  •  259
    Dharmakīrti and Husserl on Negative Judgments
    In Chan-Fai Cheung & Chung-Chi Yu (eds.), Phenomenology 2005, Vol. I, Selected Essays from Asia,, Zeta Books. pp. 731-746. 2007.
    Among various opinions in the controversy over the the cognition of non-existent objects (asad-ālambana-vijñāna) among various Buddhist and Indian philosophical schools or in the debate on the objectless presentations (gegenstandslose Vorstellungen) happened in the early development of phenomenology and analytic philosophy, I find that Dharmakīrti and Husserl hold similar views. Both of them have less interest in redefining the ontological status of nonexistent objects than Russell and Meinong. …Read more