•  1
    The principle of alternative possibilities
    with Libertarian Freedom
    In Charles Harry Manekin & Menachem Marc Kellner (eds.), Freedom and Moral Responsibility: General and Jewish Perspectives, University Press of Maryland. 1997.
  •  758
    The Problem of Evil
    Faith and Philosophy 2 (4): 392-423. 1985.
    This paper considers briefly the approach to the problem of evil by Alvin Plantinga, Richard Swinburne, and John Hick and argues that none of these approaches is entirely satisfactory. The paper then develops a different strategy for dealing with the problem of evil by expounding and taking seriously three Christian claims relevant to the problem: Adam fell; natural evil entered the world as a result of Adam's fall; and after death human beings go either to heaven or hell. Properly interpreted, …Read more
  •  2
    27 The Problem of Evil
    In Eleonore Stump & Michael J. Murray (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: The Big Questions, Blackwell. pp. 6--4. 1999.
  •  105
    The Nature of a Simple God
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87 33-42. 2013.
  •  181
    Scholars discussing Aquinas’s ethics typically understand it as largely Aristotelian, though with some differences accounted for by the differences in world­view between Aristotle and Aquinas. In this paper, I argue against this view. I show that although Aquinas recognizes the Aristotelian virtues, he thinks they are not real virtues. Instead, for Aquinas, the passions—or the suitably formulated intellectual and volitional analogues to the passions—are not only the foundation of any real ethica…Read more
  •  13
    Scholars discussing Aquinas’s ethics typically understand it as largely Aristotelian, though with some differences accounted for by the differences in world­view between Aristotle and Aquinas. In this paper, I argue against this view. I show that although Aquinas recognizes the Aristotelian virtues, he thinks they are not real virtues. Instead, for Aquinas, the passions—or the suitably formulated intellectual and volitional analogues to the passions—are not only the foundation of any real ethica…Read more
  •  22
  •  52
    The Logic of God Incarnate
    Faith and Philosophy 6 (2): 218-223. 1989.
  •  18
    The Concept of God
    Philosophical Review 86 (3): 398. 1977.
  •  39
    The Divine Trinity
    Faith and Philosophy 3 (4): 463-468. 1986.
  • The Cambridge Companion to Augustine
    with Norman Kretzmann
    Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 64 (4): 769-770. 2002.
  •  16
    The Cambridge Companion to Augustine (edited book)
    with Norman Kretzmann
    Cambridge University Press. 2001.
    It is hard to overestimate the importance of the work of Augustine of Hippo, both in his own period and in the subsequent history of Western philosophy. Until the thirteenth century, when he may have had a competitor in Thomas Aquinas, he was the most important philosopher of the medieval period. Many of his views, including his theory of the just war, his account of time and eternity, his understanding of the will, his attempted resolution of the problem of evil, and his approach to the relatio…Read more
  •  5
    The Cambridge Companion to Augustine
    with Norman Kretzmann
    Philosophical Quarterly 53 (211): 285-286. 2003.
  •  5
    St. Thomas Aquinas on the Existence of God: Collected Papers of Joseph Owens (review)
    International Studies in Philosophy 14 (2): 114-115. 1982.
  •  187
    The Cosmological Argument from Plato to Leibniz
    Review of Metaphysics 36 (3): 701-703. 1983.
    As he makes plain in the preface, Craig's purpose in writing this book is to provide a historical, rather than a critical, exposition of the cosmological proof for the existence of God. In recent years, interest in the cosmological argument has been increasing, but evaluation of it on the part of philosophers of religion has been marked by "woeful ignorance of the historical versions of the argument," as Craig quite correctly remarks. In this book, Craig attempts to lay the foundation for more i…Read more
  •  52
    The Atonement and the Problem of Shame in advance
    Journal of Philosophical Research. forthcoming.
  •  55
    The Atonement and the Problem of Shame
    Journal of Philosophical Research 41 (9999): 111-129. 2016.
    The atonement has been traditionally understood to be a solution to the problem created by the human proneness to moral wrongdoing. This problem includes both guilt and shame. Although the problem of human guilt is theologically more central to the doctrine of the atonement, the problem of shame is something that the atonement might be supposed to remedy as well if it is to be a complete antidote to the problems generated by human wrongdoing. In this paper, I discuss the difference between guilt…Read more
  •  36
    Simplicity Made Plainer: A Reply to Ross
    with Norman Kretzmann
    Faith and Philosophy 4 (2): 198-201. 1987.
    The authors try to show that many of the differences between Ross and themselves are only apparent, masking considerable agreement. Among the real disagreements, at least one is over the interpretation of Aquinas’s account of divine simplicity, but the mostcentral disagreement consists in the authors’ claim that their concern was not with a distinction between the way God is and the way he might have been but with the difference between the way God is necessarily and the way he is contingently. …Read more
  •  17
    Science, Reason, and Religion
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 85 15-17. 2011.
  •  41
    St. Thomas Aquinas on the Existence of God
    International Studies in Philosophy 14 (2): 114-115. 1982.
  •  1
    Studies in Medieval Jewish Philosophy
    with Israel Efros
    Philosophical Review 85 (3): 412. 1976.
  •  70
    Saadia Gaon on the Problem of Evil
    Faith and Philosophy 14 (4): 523-549. 1997.
    Considerable effort has been expended on constructing theodicies which try to reconcile the suffering of unwilling innocents, such as Job, with the existence and nature of God as understood in Christian theology. There is, of course, abundant reflection on the problem of evil and the story of Job in the history of Jewish thought, but this material has not been discussed much in contemporary philosophical literature. I want to take a step towards remedying this defect by examining the interpretat…Read more
  •  1
    Samson and self-destroying evil
    In Charles Harry Manekin & Robert Eisen (eds.), Philosophers and the Jewish Bible, University Press of Maryland. 2008.
  •  72
    Second-Person Accounts and the Problem of Evil
    Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 57 (4): 745-771. 2001.
    In this paper, the author argues that a second-person experience is an experience one has when one has conscious awareness of another consciously aware person. The author shows that there are some things we know in second-person experiences which are either difficult or impossible to put in propositional form at all but stories can capture them for us. An account of a second-person experience is what we typically find in narratives. The author argues that the second-person point of view has a sp…Read more