•  13
    Logic and Philosophy a Modern Introduction
    with Howard Kahane and Frank Boardman
    Wadsworth Pub. Co. 1969.
    A comprehensive introduction to formal logic, _Logic and Philosophy: A Modern Introduction_ is a rigorous yet accessible text, appropriate for students encountering the subject for the first time. Abundant, carefully crafted exercise sets accompanied by a clear, engaging exposition build to an exploration of sentential logic, first-order predicate logic, the theory of descriptions, identity, relations, set theory, modal logic, and Aristotelian logic. And as its title suggests, _Logic and Philoso…Read more
  •  12
    Logic and Philosophy a Modern Introduction
    with Howard Kahane and Frank Boardman
    Wadsworth Pub. Co. 1969.
    A comprehensive introduction to formal logic, _Logic and Philosophy: A Modern Introduction_ is a rigorous yet accessible text, appropriate for students encountering the subject for the first time. Abundant, carefully crafted exercise sets accompanied by a clear, engaging exposition build to an exploration of sentential logic, first-order predicate logic, the theory of descriptions, identity, relations, set theory, modal logic, and Aristotelian logic. And as its title suggests, _Logic and Philoso…Read more
  •  1
    Strawson on the Traditional Logic
    Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 12 (n/a): 254. 1969.
  •  8
    Carnap and Goodman: Two Formalists
    with Fred Wilson
    Philosophy of Science 36 (3): 327-330. 1969.
  •  5
    Descartes’s Secular Semantics
    with David Hausman
    Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (1): 81-104. 1992.
    … if we bear well in mind the scope of our senses and what it is exactly that reaches our faculty of thinking by way of them, we must admit that in no case are the ideas of things presented to us by the senses just as we form them in our thinking. So much so that there is nothing in our ideas which is not innate to the mind or the faculty of thinking, with the sole exception of those circumstances which relate to experience, such as the fact that we judge that this or that idea which we now have…Read more
  •  13
    Frontmatter
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. 1997.
  •  5
    Contents
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. 1997.
  •  10
    6. Hume's Use of Illicit Substances
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 79-98. 1997.
  •  4
    Acknowledgments
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. 1997.
  •  10
    5. A New Approach to Berkeley's Ideal Reality
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 65-78. 1995.
  •  5
    Notes
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 117-138. 1997.
  •  1
    Introduction
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. 1997.
  •  14
  •  1
    References
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 139-142. 1997.
  •  4
    3. The Secularity of the Meditations
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 29-47. 1997.
  •  4
    1. Machines, Meaning, and the Theory of Ideas
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 1-12. 1997.
  •  5
    Epilogue
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 112-116. 1997.
  •  4
    2. Descartes's Semantic Intentions
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 13-28. 1997.
  •  3
    Subject Index
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 145-148. 1997.
  •  3
    Name Index
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 143-144. 1997.
  • Goodman's Ontology
    Dissertation, The University of Iowa. 1966.
  •  11
    Logic and Philosophy: A Modern Introduction
    Wadsworth, Cengage Learning. 2013.
    As the title suggests, this is a book devoted not merely to logic; students will also examine the philosophical debates that led to the development of the field.
  •  24
    Descartes' Dualism (review)
    with David B. Hausman
    Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (2): 318-320. 1998.
    318 JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 36:2 APRIL 1998 stress should not be placed on Spinoza's excommunication . One among many who held radical views and during a period of unrest brought on by an influx of emigration, Spinoza was dealt the same punishment as those who failed to pay their communal dues. The apt conclusion drawn is that from the perspective of the commu- nity, this excommunication was of no great significance. Such history corrects earlier interpretations and helps readers to…Read more
  •  14
  •  25
    When Keats identified truth and beauty, he surely intended mere extensionality. I myself have never had much trouble with either half of the equivalence. Others have considerable difficulty. A case in point is the Watson-Allaire-Cummins interpretation of Berkeley's idealism, which I shall refer to henceforth as the inherence account. That account is put forward to answer an extremely perplexing question in the history of philosophy: Why did Berkeley embrace idealism, i.e., why did he hold that e…Read more
  • Non-Euclidean geometry and relative consistency proofs
    In Peter K. Machamer & Robert G. Turnbull (eds.), Motion and Time, Space and Matter, Ohio State University Press. 1976.