•  7
    Collateral Legal Consequences and the Power to Punish
    with Milena Tripkovic
    Journal of Applied Philosophy. forthcoming.
    Collateral legal consequences attached to criminal convictions (CLCs) are often criticised because they expose criminal offenders to various forms of harmful and/or wrongful treatment. In this article, we argue that CLCs are problematic because they undermine the power to punish, a distinct normative power that allows the relevant powerholders to directly change the offender's normative situation. The article identifies important features of the power to punish construed as the normative ability…Read more
  •  376
  •  14
    Are Private Prisons Intrinsically Wrong? An Analysis
    with Göran Duus-Otterström
    Jus Cogens 6 (1): 29-46. 2024.
    Several critics have argued that private prisons are not only problematic because of their worse effects but also intrinsically wrong. This article analyzes two prominent arguments for this claim: the representation argument and the condemnation argument. The conclusion is that these arguments fail to show that there is something intrinsically wrong about private prisons. This is especially true if the arguments are extended to non-profit private prisons under social injustice contexts that stat…Read more
  •  19
    Desert Retributivism: A Deweyan Critique
    The Journal of Ethics 27 (3): 285-303. 2023.
    In this article, I argue that Michael Moore’s (1997), and other similar formulations of desert retributivism – viz., the theory that holds punishment to be justified because of the deserved suffering it imposes on guilty offenders – are epistemically problematic. The argument draws on John Dewey’s inchoate critique of retribution, and on Dewey’s more general contention that the justification of ethical judgments and principles proceeds ex post – viz., that it depends on the experiences elicited …Read more
  •  199
    Is public policy ethics possible and, if so, is it desirable? This twofold question can – and sometimes does — elicit a smile or a frown. The smile implies that ethical theorizing rests on a naïve idea of policy-making; the frown implies that there is something tasteless or incongruous in expecting philosophy to engage with problems of policy and with the political bargaining and compromise that policy-making often involves. These reactions – familiar to many working in this academic discipline…Read more
  • Editorial
    Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 25 (4): 525-527. 2022.
  •  1
    Editorial
    Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1-3. forthcoming.
  •  28
    Too old to vote? A democratic analysis of age-weighted voting
    European Journal of Political Theory 22 (4): 565-586. 2023.
    Are there any prima facie reasons that democracies might have for disenfranchising older citizens? This question reflects increasingly salient, but often incompletely theorized complaints that members of democratic publics advance about older citizens’ electoral influence. Rather than rejecting these complaints out of hand, we explore whether, suitably reconstructed, they withstand democratic scrutiny. More specifically, we examine whether the account of political equality that seems to most fit…Read more
  •  28
    Social Injustice, Disadvantaged Offenders, and the State’s Authority to Punish
    Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (1): 73-93. 2020.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
  •  20
    Waiving Jury Deliberation
    Social Theory and Practice 46 (1): 181-204. 2020.
    This article argues that, given the current pervasive uncertainty about the reliability of jury deliberation, we ought to treat it with epistemic humility. I further argue that epistemic humility should be expressed and enforced by turning jury deliberation from a mandatory rule of the jury trial to a waivable right of the defendant. I consider two main objections to my argument: the first one concerns the putative self-defeatingness of humility attitudes; the second objection points to the burd…Read more
  •  42
    Corrective Justice as A Principle of Criminal Law: A Prolegomenon
    Criminal Law and Philosophy 12 (4): 605-623. 2018.
    This article argues that corrective justice is an adequate principle of criminalization. On my interpretation, corrective justice holds that, in order for an action to count as a crime, there needs to be a plausible normative story about an offender having violated the interests of a victim in a way that disturbs their relationship as equal persons and a subsequent story about responding to crime in a way that corrects this disturbance. More specifically, I claim that corrective justice is conce…Read more
  •  28
    Staying in or moving out? Justice and the abolition of the dark ghetto
    European Journal of Political Theory 19 (1). 2020.
    Tommie Shelby articulates a nonideal theory of black US ghettos that casts them as consequences of an intolerably unjust institutional structure. I argue that, despite some of its significant merits, Shelby’s theory is weakened by his rejection of integration as a principle for reforming disadvantaged ghettos and correcting structural injustices in the US. In particular, I argue that Shelby unwarrantedly downplays the socio-economic efficiency of integrationist policies and fails to consider som…Read more
  •  28
    Staying in or moving out? Justice and the abolition of the dark ghetto
    Https://Doi.Org/10.1177/1474885117730674. forthcoming.
    Tommie Shelby articulates a nonideal theory of black US ghettos that casts them as consequences of an intolerably unjust institutional structure. I argue that, despite some of its significant merits, Shelby’s theory is weakened by his rejection of integration as a principle for reforming disadvantaged ghettos and correcting structural injustices in the US. In particular, I argue that Shelby unwarrantedly downplays the socio-economic efficiency of integrationist policies and fails to consider som…Read more
  •  24
    Punishment without Pain. Outline for a Non-Afflictive Definition of Legal Punishment
    Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 5 (1). 2015.
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