•  27
    Arcesilaus and the Ontology of Stoic Cognition
    Review of Metaphysics 73 (March): 455-493. 2020.
    The focus of this paper is the dispute between the Academic Arcesilaus of Pitane (ca. 316–240 BC) and the philosophy of Zeno of Citium. Scholars typically claim that Arcesilaus set out to attack Zeno’s epistemology or theory of knowledge. The framework of epistemology prevails in the modern reconstruction of Arcesilaus’s arguments. Proponents of this framework usually contend that the epistemic possibility of Stoic “cognition” or “apprehension” (κατάληψις) is the principal aim of Arcesilaus’s at…Read more
  •  19
    Becoming Like a Woman
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1): 1-19. 2016.
    Interpreters of Theaetetus are prone to endorse the view that a god gave Socrates maieutic skill. This paper challenges that view. It provides a different account of the skill’s origins, and reconstructs a genealogy of Socratic philosophy that begins and has its end in human experience. Three distinct origins coordinate to bring forth a radically new conception of philosophy in the image of female midwifery: the state of wonder, the exercise of producing, examining and disavowing beliefs in the …Read more
  •  6
    Becoming Like a Woman: Philosophy in Plato's Theaetetus
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4): 1-21. 2016.
    Interpreters of Theaetetus are prone to endorse the view that a god gave Socrates maieutic skill. This paper challenges that view. It provides a different account of the skill’s origins, and reconstructs a genealogy of Socratic philosophy that begins and has its end in human experience. Three distinct origins coordinate to bring forth a radically new conception of philosophy in the image of female midwifery: the state of wonder (1. efficient origin), the exercise of producing, examining and disa…Read more
  •  2
    Charles E. Snyder considers the New Academy's attacks on Stoic epistemology through a critical re-assessment of the 3rd century philosopher, Arcesilaus of Pitane. Arguing that the standard epistemological framework used to study the ancient Academy ignores the metaphysical dimensions at stake in Arcesilaus's critique, Snyder explores new territory for the historiography of Stoic-Academic debates in the early Hellenistic period. Focusing on the dispute between the Old and New Academy, reveals the…Read more
  •  2
    Making Sense of Citizen Dissent
    Amor Mundi: Hannah Arendt Center Newsletter. 2018.
  •  2
    The Platonism of Hannah Arendt
    Amor Mundi, The Hannah Arendt Center Newsletter. 2016.
  • On the Teaching of Ethics from Polemo to Arcesilaus
    Études Platoniciennes 14. 2018.
    Less than a century after Plato’s death, the Academy’s scholarch Arcesilaus of Pitane inaugurates a peculiar oral phase of Academic philosophy, deciding not to write philosophical works or openly teach his own doctrines. Scholars often attribute a radical change of direction to the school under his headship, taking early Stoic epistemology to be the primary target of the New Academy’s attack on Stoic philosophy. This paper defends a rival view of Arcesilaus’ Academic revolution. Shifting the foc…Read more
  • Foucault and the Historiography of Early Hellenistic Philosophy
    Critical Horizons: A Journal of Philosophy and Social Theory. 2021.
    In his 1981–82 lectures The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Michel Foucault claims that a significant portion of the modern historiography of ancient philosophy tends to discredit the ethical framework of epimeleia heautou (“care of the self”). The prevalence of the thematic analysis of knowledge in the historiography of ancient philosophy has an overshadowing effect on the theme of care of the self. Taking Foucault’s claim as a point of departure, the aim of this paper is twofold. First, the paper…Read more
  • Concepts of Love in Augustine
    In Peter Gratton and Yasemin Sari (ed.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Arendt. pp. 29-33. 2020.
    This article is an examination of Hannah Arendt's 1929 dissertation.
  • Plato and the Freedom of the New Academy
    In Harold Tarrant, François Renaud, Dirk Baltzly & Danielle A. Layne (eds.), Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity, Brill. 2017.
    Scholars of Greek and Roman antiquity advance a variety of reasons to explain why the study of Hellenistic philosophy remains dependent on fragments and testimonies. Mansfeld observes such dependence in his use of the premise that philosophers of late antiquity based philosophical instruction and school curricula on a core set of writings from the classical period. On this basis, Mansfeld infers that schools of late antiquity continually transcribed and preserved writings of instructional sign…Read more
  • Foucault and the Historiography of Early Hellenistic Philosophy
    Critical Horizons 22 (3): 272-286. 2021.
    ABSTRACT In his 1981–82 lectures The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Michel Foucault claims that a significant portion of the modern historiography of ancient philosophy tends to discredit the ethical framework of epimeleia heautou. The thematic analysis of knowledge in the historiography of ancient philosophy overshadows the theme of care of the self. Taking Foucault’s claim as a point of departure, the aim of this paper is twofold. First, the paper provides a genealogy of the early Hellenistic Ac…Read more