University of Texas at Austin
University of St. Andrews
Johns Hopkins University
Department of Philosophy
PhD
Austin, Texas, United States of America
Areas of Specialization
Value Theory
Meta-Ethics
Normative Ethics
Areas of Interest
Value Theory
  • Global utilitarianism
    In Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Utilitarianism, Cambridge University Press. pp. 166--176. 2014.
  •  70
    Expertise and Evaluation
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 102 (1): 220-226. 2021.
  •  25
    From the Editors
    Ethics 131 (1): 1-3. 2020.
  •  1
    The ‘Consequentialism’ in ‘Epistemic Consequentialism’
    In Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij & Jeff Dunn (eds.), Epistemic Consequentialism, Oxford University Press. pp. 113-22. 2018.
  •  47
    Love and Unselfing in Iris Murdoch
    Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 87 169-180. 2020.
    Iris Murdoch believes that unselfing is required for virtue, as it takes us out of our egoistic preoccupations, and connects us to the Good in the world. Love is a form of unselfing, illustrating how close attention to another, and the way they really are, again, takes us out of a narrow focus on the self. Though this view of love runs counter to a view that those in love often overlook flaws in their loved ones, or at least down-play them, I argue that it is compatible with Murdoch's view that …Read more
  • Book reviews (review)
    with Steven M. DeLue, Karl W. Schweizer, Margaret J. Osler, Michael Allen Fox, Donald Rutherford, Philip Lawrence, David Olster, Pete Wilcox, Kristian Gerner, Tracey Rowland, Deborah L. Madsen, Karl Newton, Hubert C. Johnson, Dieter A. Binder, Cheng‐Chung Lai, L. M. Stallbaumer, Richard A. Lebrun, Scott McCracken, Joyce Senders Pedersen, Graham Richards, Eckehart Stöve, Paola S. Timiras, Steven Nadler, Angela Elliott, Maryse Bray, William H. Sherman, E. J. Hundert, Anthony Pym, Paul E. Corcoran, Hironori Ito, Mark Charles Fissel, Helen Pringle, Bob Scribner, Elfrieda Dubois, Janine Maltz, Harold Stone, David J. Hall, David A. Warner, John Morrow, Elliott Levine, D. R. Hainsworth, Mark Walker, Richard S. Findler, Edna Hindie Lemay, Jane T. Burton, Fred S. Michael, Emily Michael, Michael Freeman, Pamela J. Clements, Steven Z. Levine, Claire Le Brun, Nancy Hudson‐Rodd, Paul Lawrence Farber, Anton van der Lem, W. W. Speck, John Christian Laursen, Anna Makolkin, John Hope Mason, and B.
    The European Legacy 2 (5): 886-951. 1997.
    Political Writings. By Joseph Priestley, edited by Peter Miller xxxix + 147 pp. £30.00 cloth, £10.95 paper. Blessings in Disguise; or, The Morality of Evil. By Jean Starobinski, translated by A. Goldham‐mer 235 pp. $39.95 cloth. Questions of Identity: Czech and Slovak Ideas of Nationality and Personality. By Robert Pynsent 244 pp. $49.94/£25.00 cloth. Voltaire: Political Writings. Edited by David Williams lii + 290 pp. $59.95/£35.00 cloth, $16.95/ £12.95 paper. The Rise and Fall of the Grenville…Read more
  •  142
    Editorial: The Review Process
    Ethics 130 (1): 1-4. 2019.
  •  1
    10. Nicholas Rescher, Objectivity: The Obligations of Impersonal Reason Nicholas Rescher, Objectivity: The Obligations of Impersonal Reason (pp. 917-919) (review)
    with Tamar Schapiro, A. John Simmons, Seana Valentine Shiffrin, Sarah Buss, G. F. Schueler, James Montmarquet, Mark van Roojen, and Samantha Brennan
    Ethics 109 (4). 1999.
  •  16
    How are We to Live? Ethics in an Age of Self-Interest
    Philosophical Review 106 (1): 125. 1997.
    Peter Singer is well known as an ethicist who has contributed much to current debates in ethics and public policy. He has published on topics ranging from vegetarianism to famine relief to bioethics, always with something interesting to say, and often with something provocative as well. How Are We to Live? adds to Singer’s work in the area of applied, or practical, ethics. This book is not as deeply challenging as some of Singer’s earlier work. However, it is not intended for an audience compose…Read more
  •  1
    Book reviews (review)
    with David Boucher, John Hope Mason, Anna Makolkin, John Christian Laursen, W. W. Speck, Anton van der Lem, Paul Lawrence Farber, Nancy Hudson‐Rodd, Claire Le Brun, Steven Z. Levine, Pamela J. Clements, Michael Freeman, Emily Michael, Fred S. Michael, Jane T. Burton, Edna Hindie Lemay, Richard S. Findler, Mark Walker, D. R. Hainsworth, Elliott Levine, John Morrow, David A. Warner, David J. Hall, Harold Stone, Janine Maltz, Elfrieda Dubois, Bob Scribner, Helen Pringle, Mark Charles Fissel, Hironori Ito, Paul E. Corcoran, Anthony Pym, E. J. Hundert, William H. Sherman, Maryse Bray, Angela Elliott, Steven Nadler, Paola S. Timiras, Eckehart Stöve, Graham Richards, Joyce Senders Pedersen, Tracey Rowland, Scott McCracken, Richard A. Lebrun, L. M. Stallbaumer, Cheng‐Chung Lai, Dieter A. Binder, Hubert C. Johnson, Karl Newton, Deborah L. Madsen, Kristian Gerner, Pete Wilcox, David Olster, Philip Lawrence, Donald Rutherford, Michael Allen Fox, Margaret J. Osler, Karl W. Schweizer, and DeL
    The European Legacy 2 (5): 886-951. 1997.
  •  33
    Manuscript Referees for The Journal of Ethics Volume 9: September 2004–June 2005
    with Justin D’Arms, Anthony Ellis, Francisco Gonzales, George W. Harris, Aleksandar Jokic, Leonard Kahn, Phillip Montague, G. Di Muzio, and Gerald Press
    The Journal of Ethics 9 (3): 581. 2005.
  • Book reviews (review)
    with Steven M. DeLue, Karl W. Schweizer, Margaret J. Osler, Michael Allen Fox, Donald Rutherford, Philip Lawrence, David Olster, Pete Wilcox, Kristian Gerner, Tracey Rowland, Deborah L. Madsen, Karl Newton, Hubert C. Johnson, Dieter A. Binder, Cheng‐Chung Lai, L. M. Stallbaumer, Richard A. Lebrun, Scott McCracken, Joyce Senders Pedersen, Graham Richards, Eckehart Stöve, Paola S. Timiras, Steven Nadler, Angela Elliott, Maryse Bray, William H. Sherman, E. J. Hundert, Anthony Pym, Paul E. Corcoran, Hironori Ito, Mark Charles Fissel, Helen Pringle, Bob Scribner, Elfrieda Dubois, Janine Maltz, Harold Stone, David J. Hall, David A. Warner, John Morrow, Elliott Levine, D. R. Hainsworth, Mark Walker, Richard S. Findler, Edna Hindie Lemay, Jane T. Burton, Fred S. Michael, Emily Michael, Michael Freeman, Pamela J. Clements, Steven Z. Levine, Claire Le Brun, Nancy Hudson‐Rodd, Paul Lawrence Farber, Anton van der Lem, W. W. Speck, John Christian Laursen, Anna Makolkin, John Hope Mason, and B.
    The European Legacy 2 (5): 886-951. 1997.
    Political Writings. By Joseph Priestley, edited by Peter Miller xxxix + 147 pp. £30.00 cloth, £10.95 paper. Blessings in Disguise; or, The Morality of Evil. By Jean Starobinski, translated by A. Goldham‐mer 235 pp. $39.95 cloth. Questions of Identity: Czech and Slovak Ideas of Nationality and Personality. By Robert Pynsent 244 pp. $49.94/£25.00 cloth. Voltaire: Political Writings. Edited by David Williams lii + 290 pp. $59.95/£35.00 cloth, $16.95/ £12.95 paper. The Rise and Fall of the Grenville…Read more
  •  5
    From Morality to Virtue
    Noûs 28 (4): 505. 1994.
  •  15
    The Metaphysics of Beauty
    Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (4): 535-536. 2002.
  •  130
    Normative Ethical theory underwent a period of refinement in some areas and proliferation in others during the 20th century. Theories prominent in the 19th century, such as Utilitarianism, underwent refinement in light of criticisms; other approaches, such as normative intuitionism and virtue ethics, were developed in new directions, ones that reflected the sophistication of analytical techniques developed by philosophers in the 20th century, particularly in ordinary language philosophy. The mid…Read more
  •  4
    Virtue theory
    In James Lawrence Dreier (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Moral Theory, Blackwell. 2006.
  •  37
    On 'What makes killing wrong?'
    Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (1): 8-8. 2013.
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Franklin Miller1 make a convincing case for their claim that what is wrong about killing someone is that one is putting the person in a state of universal and irreversible disability. Thus, killing in and of itself is not an additional harm for a person who has been universally and irreversibly disabled. The implications for such a view are, as they note, quite wide-ranging. Given advances in medical technology, there are individuals being kept alive now who are univ…Read more
  •  22
    Principles of Reasoning
    Teaching Philosophy 14 (1): 75-76. 1991.
  •  35
    Minimal Virtue
    The Monist 99 (2): 97-111. 2016.
  •  34
    The Logic of Real Arguments
    Teaching Philosophy 12 (2): 182-184. 1989.
  •  86
    Pleasure as the standard of virtue in Hume's moral philosophy
    Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (2). 2004.
    But in many orders of beauty, particularly those of the finer arts, it is requisite to employ much reasoning, in order to feel the proper sentiment; and a false relish may frequently be corrected by argument and reflection. There are just grounds to conclude, that moral beauty partakes much of this latter species, and demands the assistance of our intellectual faculties, in order to give it a suitable influence on the human mind (EPM, 173)
  • HARRIS, GW-Agent-Centered Morality
    Philosophical Books 42 (3): 217-219. 2001.
  • Normative ethics
    In Frank Jackson & Michael Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy, Oxford University Press. 2005.
  •  14
    Moralism
    Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2): 137-151. 2005.
    abstract In this paper moralism is defined as the illicit use of moral considerations. Three different varieties of moralism are then discussed — moral absolutism, excessive standards and demandingness, and presenting non‐moral considerations as moral ones. Both individuals and theories can be regarded as moralistic in some of these senses. Indeed, some critics of consequentialism have regarded that theory as moralistic. The author then describes the problems associated with each sense of ‘moral…Read more
  •  82
    Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe
    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2009.
  •  38
    Morality, Philosophy, and Practice
    Teaching Philosophy 12 (3): 283-285. 1989.
  •  127
    Dream immorality
    Philosophy 82 (1): 5-22. 2007.
    This paper focuses on an underappreciated issue that dreams raise for moral evaluation: is immorality possible in dreams? The evaluatiotial internalist is committed to answering ‘yes.’ This is because the internalist account of moral evaluation holds that the moral quality of a person's actions, what a person does, her agency in any given case is completely determined by factors that are internal to that agency, such as the person's motives and/or intentions. Actual production of either good or …Read more