•  1
    Against Interrogational Torture: Upholding a Troubled Taboo
    In David Boonin, Katrina L. Sifferd, Tyler K. Fagan, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Michael Huemer, Daniel Wodak, Derk Pereboom, Stephen J. Morse, Sarah Tyson, Mark Zelcer, Garrett VanPelt, Devin Casey, Philip E. Devine, David K. Chan, Maarten Boudry, Christopher Freiman, Hrishikesh Joshi, Shelley Wilcox, Jason Brennan, Eric Wiland, Ryan Muldoon, Mark Alfano, Philip Robichaud, Kevin Timpe, David Livingstone Smith, Francis J. Beckwith, Dan Hooley, Russell Blackford, John Corvino, Corey McCall, Dan Demetriou, Ajume Wingo, Michael Shermer, Ole Martin Moen, Aksel Braanen Sterri, Teresa Blankmeyer Burke, Jeppe von Platz, John Thrasher, Mary Hawkesworth, William MacAskill, Daniel Halliday, Janine O’Flynn, Yoaav Isaacs, Jason Iuliano, Claire Pickard, Arvin M. Gouw, Tina Rulli, Justin Caouette, Allen Habib, Brian D. Earp, Andrew Vierra, Subrena E. Smith, Danielle M. Wenner, Lisa Diependaele, Sigrid Sterckx, G. Owen Schaefer, Markus K. Labude, Harisan Unais Nasir, Udo Schuklenk, Benjamin Zolf & Woolwine (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy, Springer Verlag. pp. 123-133. 2018.
    Until recently, torture was regarded as an unthinkable act. But in the dark years following September 11, 2001, many people have defended it openly as they have many other kinds of action previously considered taboo. And the underlying issues are complicated. Yet at least a virtually absolute prohibition on interrogational torture can be rationally defended.
  •  15
    One of the deepest problems in philosophical theology is that of divine causality and human freedom. The analogy between God and the author of a work of fiction can shed light on this and many other thorny problems in philosophical and dogmatic theology.
  •  10
    On Slippery Slopes
    Philosophy 93 (3): 375-393. 2018.
  •  16
    The Ethics of Homicide
    with R. A. Duff
    Philosophical Quarterly 30 (120): 273. 1980.
  •  11
    What’s Wrong with Torture?
    International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (3): 317-332. 2009.
    Many of us want to say that there is an absolute—or at least a virtually absolute—prohibition on torturing people. But we live in a world in which firm moral restraints of all sorts are hard to defend. Neither contemporary conventional morality, nor any of the available moral theories, provides adequate support for the deliverances of the “wisdom of repugnance” in this area. Nor do they support casuistry capable of distinguishing torture from forms of rough treatment. I here make some suggestion…Read more
  •  8
    Ideologues Or Scholars?
    International Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2): 69-78. 1991.
  •  71
    Abortion: Three Perspectives
    with Michael Tooley, Celia Wolf-Devine, and Alison M. Jaggar
    Oup Usa. 2009.
    The newest addition to the Point/Counterpoint Series, Abortion: Three Perspectives features a debate between four noted philosophers - Michael Tooley, Celia Wolf-Devine, Philip E. Devine, and Alison M. Jaggar - presenting different perspectives on one of the most socially and politically argued issues of the past 30 years. The three main arguments include the "liberal" pro-choice approach, the "communitarian" pro-life approach, and the "gender justice" approach. Divided into two parts, the text …Read more
  •  30
    On the Public Responsibilities of Philosophers
    Teaching Philosophy 10 (1): 3-12. 1987.
  •  21
    The principle of double effect
    American Journal of Jurisprudence 19 (1): 44. 1974.
  •  7
    Ideologues or scholars?
    International Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2): 69-78. 1991.
  • The species principle and the potential principle
    Bioethics: Readings and Cases. New Jersey, Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall Inc. forthcoming.
  •  17
    Abortion & the 'Middle' View
    Hastings Center Report 10 (3): 4-4. 1980.
  • TOOLEY, MICHAEL Abortion and Infanticide (review)
    Philosophy 59 (n/a): 545. 1984.
  •  48
    Letters to the Editor
    with Sandra Lee Bartky, Marilyn Friedman, William Harper, Alison M. Jaggar, Richard H. Miller, Abigail L. Rosenthal, Naomi Scheman, Nancy Tuana, Steven Yates, Christina Sommers, Harry Deutsch, Michael Kelly, and Charles L. Reid
    Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 65 (7). 1992.
  •  1
    Natural Law Ethics
    Greenwood Press. 1999.
    Presents a contemporary version of the natural law tradition as a valid approach to ethical problems.
  • FRENCH, P.-The Virtues of Vengeance
    Philosophical Books 44 (3): 282-282. 2003.
  •  69
    What’s Wrong with Torture?
    International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (3): 317-332. 2009.
    Many of us want to say that there is an absolute—or at least a virtually absolute—prohibition on torturing people. But we live in a world in which firm moral restraints of all sorts are hard to defend. Neither contemporary conventional morality, nor any of the available moral theories, provides adequate support for the deliverances of the “wisdom of repugnance” in this area. Nor do they support casuistry capable of distinguishing torture from (sometimes legitimate) forms of rough treatment. I he…Read more
  •  59
    Creation and Evolution: PHILIP E. DEVINE
    Religious Studies 32 (3): 325-337. 1996.
    Despite the bad reputation of the legal profession, law remains king in America. A highly diverse society relies on the laws to maintain a working sense of the dignity and inviability of each individual. And a persistent element in contemporary debates is the fear that naturalistic theories of the human person will erode our belief that we have a dignity greater than that of other natural objects. Thus the endurance of the creation vs. evolution debate is due less to the arguments of creationist…Read more
  •  5
    It seems clear that the ontological argument can no longer be dismissed as a silly fallacy. The dogma of the impossibility of necessary existence is seriously threatened by the case of necessary existential truths in mathematics, and as for the claim that the ontological argument must beg the question, since by mentioning God in the premise his existence is presupposed, it is undermined by the fact that we often refer to things—Hamlet for instance— we do not for a moment think exist. The doctrin…Read more
  • Academic freedom in the postmodern world
    Public Affairs Quarterly 10 (3): 185-201. 1996.
  •  13
    The Evidential Force of Religious Experience
    Review of Metaphysics 44 (2): 419-420. 1990.
    Caroline Franks Davis here undertakes an assessment of the value of religious experiences as evidence for religious beliefs. She distinguishes this question from that of the veridical character of particular experiences or their value for the person undergoing them or his community. She attends both to the phenomenological variety of religious experiences and the variety of cultural settings in which they take place. She concludes that religious experience can form an important part of the case …Read more
  •  66
    Relativism
    The Monist 67 (3): 405-418. 1984.
  •  7
    Intrinsic Value: Concept and Warrant
    Philosophical Books 37 (3): 202-204. 1996.
  •  8
    Comparable Worth
    International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (3): 11-19. 1987.