Joachim Schulte

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  •  6
    Philosophische Superlative und die Maschine als Symbol
    Wittgenstein-Studien 12 (1): 1-36. 2021.
    Philosophical Superlatives: Machines as Symbols. – In this paper, my chief aim is to present a close reading of parts of a central sequence of remarks from Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations. The apparent theme of this sequence is the idea of a ‘machine as a symbol of its mode of operation’. Obviously, this idea requires a good deal of clarification, and the present paper attempts to elucidate relevant passages which, in their turn, are discussed in the hope of succeeding in spelling ou…Read more
  •  3
    This paper is an attempt at bringing out various aesthetically relevant points alluded to by Wittgenstein in what I call ‘the Engelmann remark’ – a longish manuscript remark written by Wittgenstein in 1930 and painstakingly discussed by Michael Fried in the context of elucidating what is strikingly new in the work of a photographer like Jeff Wall. One part of this paper is dedicated to summarizing and briefly examining the account given by Fried while another part is meant to clarify some of Wit…Read more
  •  38
  • Wittgenstein and the Vienna Circle
    with Friedrich Waismann and Brian Mcguinness
    Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 42 (1): 166-166. 1980.
  • Wittgensteins Wandlungen. Neuere Literatur zu Wittgenstein im Licht der "mittleren Periode"
    Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Philosophie 24 (1): 35-56. 1999.
  •  20
    Wittgenstein: an Introduction
    with L. F. S., W. H. Brenner, and J. F. Holley
    Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183): 281. 1996.
    Joachim Schulte’s introduction provides a distinctive and masterful account of the full range of Wittgenstein’s thought. It is concise but not compressed, substantive but not overloaded with developmental or technical detail, informed by the latest scholarship but not pedantic. Beginners will find it accessible and seasoned students of Wittgenstein will appreciate it for the illuminating overview it provides
  • Zum Harmonie-Kapitel der „Philosophischen Untersuchungen“
    Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 52 (3): 389. 2004.
  • Wittgenstein on emotion
    In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives, Palgrave-macmillan. pp. 27. 2009.
  • Logisch-Philosophische Abhandlung Kritische Edition = Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
    with Ludwig Wittgenstein and Brian Mcguinness
    . 1989.
  • Ethics and the Will Essays
    with Friedrich Waismann, Brian Mcguinness, Moritz Schlick, and Y. Shechter
    . 1994.
  • Wittgenstein-Our Untimely Contemporary
    Acta Philosophica Fennica 77 59. 2005.
  • Wittgenstein in Exile
    Grazer Philosophische Studien 86 (1): 287-290. 2012.
  • Természettörténet és a másik megértése
    Magyar Filozofiai Szemle 4. 1999.
  •  57
    There are similarities between Davidson's theory of meaning and that of Wttgenstein's Tractatus. But in Wittgenstein's later work the relation between meaning and use is seen in a completely different way and not in the least similar to Davidson's conception. In spite of this divergence, however, certain parallels exist between Wittgenstein's treatment of expressions which can be said to have secondary meanings and Davidson's notion of the metaphorical use of certain expressions
  •  14
    Weltseele
    Wittgenstein-Studien 1 (2). 1994.
  •  4
    Wittgenstein's last work, On Certainty , is widely regarded as his third masterpiece of philosophy and one of his most enigmatic writings. On Certainty explores the ways in which claims of indisputable knowledge are expressed, and how language forms the basis of such claims. On Certainty has largely been read as representing a break with Wittgenstein's previous thinking, but this study places these ideas firmly in the development of his thought since the 1930s. Wittgenstein on Certainty and Doub…Read more
  •  42
    The pneumatic conception of thought
    Grazer Philosophische Studien 71 (1): 39-55. 2006.
    This paper is an attempt at presenting a convincing reading of the first sentences of PI § 109, especially of its third sentence. There Wittgenstein mentions what he calls "the pneumatic conception of thought", which by Miss Anscombe is translated as "the conception of thought as a gaseous medium". By comparing the relevant sentences with their sources in Wittgenstein's manuscripts and additional parallels it is found that Anscombe's rendering is liable to be misleading. Wittgenstein's notion of…Read more
  •  58
    World-picture and mythology
    Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 31 (3). 1988.
    Partly by way of contrast with a conception described by Kleist, Wittgenstein's notions of world?picture and mythology are explained and three types of statement playing a particularly important role with respect to our world?picture or pictures distinguished. Problems concerning sentences which contain normative elements are discussed and a test for what to count as a statement giving information about our world?picture is proposed. A mythology in Wittgenstein's sense is characterized as a stru…Read more
  •  6
    The Happy Man
    Grazer Philosophische Studien 42 (1): 3-21. 1992.
    The question of who or what the happy man mentioned in Wittgenstein's Tractatus really is leads to a discussion of connected issues, e.g. the question of the Schopenhauerian origins of certain key notions of Wittgenstein's early philosophy, the import of the concept of a world-soul, the topic of solipsism, and the puzzling question of what is involved in the self's identification with the world.
  •  22
    We Have a Colour System as We Have a Number System
    In Stefan Riegelnik & Frederik A. Gierlinger (eds.), Wittgenstein on Colour, De Gruyter. pp. 21-32. 2014.
  •  19
    The reception of Wittgenstein's philosophy in finland
    Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 80 (1): 391-409. 2003.
  •  8
    There are similarities between Davidson's theory of meaning and that of Wttgenstein's Tractatus. But in Wittgenstein's later work the relation between meaning and use is seen in a completely different way and not in the least similar to Davidson's conception. In spite of this divergence, however, certain parallels exist between Wittgenstein's treatment of expressions which can be said to have secondary meanings and Davidson's notion of the metaphorical use of certain expressions.
  •  20
    Waismann as Spokesman for Wittgenstein
    Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 15 225-241. 2011.
    In 1929 Wittgenstein left Vienna for Cambridge, and Waismann grew into the role of spokesman for his absent hero. The story of his relation with the man so greatly esteemed by his much-admired mentor Schlick contains dramatic elements: there were moments of friction and of coldness, announcements of withdrawal from a shared project, accusations of plagiarism or, at least, insuffi cient acknowledgement. What we know of this story has been told by Brian McGuinness and Gordon Baker. If one wishes t…Read more
  •  6
    Tennis ohne Ball
    Wittgenstein-Studien 3 (1): 1-18. 2012.