•  40
    Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions
    with Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor, and Bernard Williams
    Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 2004.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better if we were immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Life, Death, and Meaning brings together key readings, primarily by English-speaking philosophers, on such 'big questions.'.
  •  37
    Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions (edited book)
    with David Benatar, Margaret A. Boden, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor, Bruce N. Waller, and Bernard Williams
    Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 2004.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better to be immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Since Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions first appeared, David Benatar's distinctive anthology designed to introduce students to the key existential questions of philosophy has won a devoted following among users in a variety of upper-level and even introductory courses.
  •  11
    Why we die (review)
    Metascience 32 (3): 371-373. 2023.
  •  11
    Two Arguments for the Harmlessness of Death
    with Nicolas Bommarito
    In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments, Wiley‐blackwell. 2011-09-16.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Epicurus' Death is Nothing to Us Argument Lucretius'Symmetry Argument.
  •  12
    The Existence of the Dead
    In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Kimberley Brownlee & David Coady (eds.), A Companion to Applied Philosophy, Wiley. 2016.
    What is death? How is it related to the existence of living things? Is it possible for something to continue its existence while dead? In this chapter I will attempt to answer these questions. I will begin by arguing that death is the loss of life. I will then consider whether living things could cease to exist without dying, and whether they could die yet continue existing. Finally, I will discuss some ways my conclusions bear on creatures like you and me.
  •  16
    Doxastic Skepticism
    Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (4): 529-538. 1987.
  •  4
    14. Annihilation
    In John Martin Fischer (ed.), The Metaphysics of death, Stanford University Press. pp. 267-290. 1993.
  • Death
    In Miriam Solomon, Jeremy R. Simon & Harold Kincaid (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Medicine, Routledge. 2016.
  •  6
    Skepticism, Relativism, and the Sociology of Knowledge
    Facta Philosophica 3 (2): 197-209. 2001.
  •  4
    When the topic of international justice did arise, discussion rarely got beyond recommendations about how nations could avoid war, as well as suggestions about when a declaration of war was morally justifiable and what sorts of methods might be used in the course of a justifiable war the topics of so-called just-war theory. Such is no longer the case.To be sure, just-war theory is reaching greater states of sophistication,much of it focused around Michael Walzer's book Just and Unjust Wars.Excer…Read more
  •  29
    How might we change ourselves without ending our existence? What could we become, if we had access to an advanced form of bioengineering that allowed us dramatically to alter our genome? Could we remain in existence after ceasing to be alive? What is it to be human? Might we still exist after changing ourselves into something that is not human? What is the significance of human extinction? Steven Luper addresses these questions and more in this thought-provoking study. He defends an animalist ac…Read more
  •  16
    A Guide to Ethics
    McGraw-Hill. 2001.
    Provides a concise introduction to ethics or moral philosophy, surveying the main ideas of moral philosophy and discussing its controversial areas. In pursuing ethics' fundamental query, how we ought to live, this book devotes space - two chapters - to the question of what the best life is like.
  •  17
    Morality and the Emotions (review)
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (3): 725-728. 1994.
  •  27
    Death and the Afterlife, written by Samuel Scheffler
    Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (1): 113-115. 2017.
  •  17
    Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing (review)
    Disputatio 1 (19): 286-289. 2005.
    019-9
  •  23
    The Absurdity of Life
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1): 85-101. 1992.
  •  43
    Justice and Natural Resources
    Environmental Values 1 (1): 47-64. 1992.
    Justice entitles everyone in the world, including future generations, to an equitable share of the benefits of the world's natural resources. I argue that even though both Rawls and his libertarian critics seem hostile to it, this resource equity principle, suitably clarified, is a major part of an adequate strict compliance theory of global justice whether or not we take a libertarian or a Rawlsian approach. I offer a defence of the resource equity principle from both points of view
  •  21
    Natural Resources, Gadgets and Artificial Life
    Environmental Values 8 (1): 27-54. 1999.
    I classify different sorts of natural resources and suggest how these resources may be acquired. I also argue that inventions, whether gadgets or artificial life forms, should not be privately owned. Gadgets and life-forms are not created (although the term 'invention' suggests otherwise); they are discovered, and hence have much in common with more familiar natural resources such as sunlight that ought not to be privately owned. Nonetheless, inventors of gadgets, like discoverers of certain mor…Read more
  •  6
    Preface
    Synthese 74 (3): 263-263. 1988.
  • After critically discussing the traditional account of knowledge and alternatives to it, this thesis offers an account of empirical knowledge and rational belief then applies the proposal to various issues about skepticism and epistemic logic. In the first part, I consider the causal theory, defeasibilism, the conclusive reasons analysis and Robert Nozick's tracking theory. In the second part I propose an account of empirical knowledge. S noninferentially knows that h if, and only if, S's belief…Read more
  •  10
    What Skeptics Don't Know Refutes Them†
    Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 65 (1): 86-96. 2017.
  •  7
    Intervention and Guatemalan Refugees
    Public Affairs Quarterly 6 (1): 45-60. 1992.
  •  26
    Epistemology Modalized, by Kelly Becker
    Mind 120 (478): 507-511. 2011.
  •  23
    The Skeptics: Contemporary Essays (edited book)
    Ashgate Press. 2003.
    Skepticism and foundations / Gilbert Harman -- How should we respond to scepticism with regard to the senses / Michael Ayers -- Scepticism and justification / Anthony Grayling -- Is knowledge easy--or impossible? Externalism as the only alternative to skepticism / James Van Cleve -- Three attempts to refute skepticism and why they fail / Richard Foley -- How a pyrrhonian skeptic might respond to academic skepticism / Peter Klein -- Skepticism, fallibility and circularity / Keith Lehrer -- Skepti…Read more